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Best mobile crusher for recycling concrete

Landclearer

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CM, we have been happy with ali of our Powerscreen stuff. They have great support and parts availability. One nice thing about Powerscreen is that is what they sell. Our Cat Dealer sells Metso or they used to, not sure. They could have cared less about them, same way with Peterson Pacific. I guess what I’m saying is a delayer that sells recycling stuff might focus more on that than a Cat Dealer.
 

DGODGR

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CM, we have been happy with ali of our Powerscreen stuff. They have great support and parts availability. One nice thing about Powerscreen is that is what they sell. Our Cat Dealer sells Metso or they used to, not sure. They could have cared less about them, same way with Peterson Pacific. I guess what I’m saying is a delayer that sells recycling stuff might focus more on that than a Cat Dealer.
I think that this is sage advice.
LC please tell us more about how the hydraulic and rebar deflectors work.
 

CM1995

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Running what I brung and taking what I win
CM, we have been happy with ali of our Powerscreen stuff. They have great support and parts availability. One nice thing about Powerscreen is that is what they sell. Our Cat Dealer sells Metso or they used to, not sure. They could have cared less about them, same way with Peterson Pacific. I guess what I’m saying is a delayer that sells recycling stuff might focus more on that than a Cat Dealer.

Thought about that as well. Local dealer carries Peterson Pacific as well and from what I've heard the service and support is good. At this time I haven't met the dealer crusher specialist as I'm not ready to demo or buy at this time. I don't wear them out with endless questions and demo's unless I'm ready to buy.

The Alabama dealer for Power Screen is located in KY. LC is your dealer Mid-Atlantic?
 

Landclearer

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DGODGR, I might be by the crusher tomorrow and if I am I will try to get a few pics.

As For the hydraulic release it had two giant cylinders and if you say have a one foot chunk of concrete and you don’t know it but it has an eight inch chunk of steel in it that is an uncrushable. The hydraulics will dump and take the pressure off the jaw and hopefully it will dump onto the belt. Fortunately we have never had to use it in that manor. I have used to clean out the jaw. There are two buttons on the control panel that allow you to open and close the jaw crushing what is in the jaw.

The rebar deflector is basically a piece of steel that you can run straight up and down or position it at an angle under the jaw so as a piece of rebar falls it is already heading to the back of the machine instead of straight down. If the rebar is straight up and down a piece of concrete falls on top of it and then you have two narrow belts.

One last comment. Our crusher is not hydraulic It runs off of belts and basically a flywheel. This is much more fuel efficient. I think on hydraulic crushers you also have to change your hyd oil pretty often. Don’t quote me on that though.
 

Landclearer

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CM yes our dealer is Powerscreen Mid Atlantic.

Our Cat Dealer used to have a mechanic that was the Peterson guy. Awesome mechanic. He could diagnose most stuff over the phone but then they moved him to a different division and they said any Cat mechanic could work on Peterson’s. Not true lol. Then they made the Cat salesman sell the grinders. Most of them don’t know what end to put the logs in. They also had Metso and I think they took it away from them. Kinda said what happened to our dealer. They used to be great.
 

DGODGR

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DGODGR, I might be by the crusher tomorrow and if I am I will try to get a few pics.

As For the hydraulic release it had two giant cylinders and if you say have a one foot chunk of concrete and you don’t know it but it has an eight inch chunk of steel in it that is an uncrushable. The hydraulics will dump and take the pressure off the jaw and hopefully it will dump onto the belt. Fortunately we have never had to use it in that manor. I have used to clean out the jaw. There are two buttons on the control panel that allow you to open and close the jaw crushing what is in the jaw.
That sounds like a feature of the hydraulically adjustable jaw opening.
That would be great if you can upload some pictures! Thanks!!

The rebar deflector is basically a piece of steel that you can run straight up and down or position it at an angle under the jaw so as a piece of rebar falls it is already heading to the back of the machine instead of straight down. If the rebar is straight up and down a piece of concrete falls on top of it and then you have two narrow belts.
I would think that the more distance that there is between the bottom of the jaw, and the belt, the rebar would be less of an issue.

One last comment. Our crusher is not hydraulic It runs off of belts and basically a flywheel. This is much more fuel efficient. I think on hydraulic crushers you also have to change your hyd oil pretty often. Don’t quote me on that though.
The PT330 had a hydraulically driven flywheel, which ran a belt to the jaw.
 

Landclearer

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DGODGR here are the pics of the release hydraulics and the rebar deflector. As you can see in the pic the piece if rebar that is crossed up in there. That is the beginning of a birds nest all you need is some wire lol. That will be taken out before we run. 1BA2398A-86D4-407E-8262-B7101A91290D.jpegCB98B2ED-2BB4-49B8-857C-9DD08F1A1BE9.jpegFDCE81E4-FE2E-45ED-92C6-97B3803FACAC.jpeg573715CF-46C8-4CB7-85AF-8E112E4E0B7C.jpeg
 

DGODGR

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I've had another Powerscreen PT330 on rent for about a month now. We took delivery of the unit when it had 90 hours on it. I pulled up to the crushing operation one day and noticed that the out put size had increased to size that I felt was too large for what I wanted to produce. Here she is with a mouthful of rock!
IMG_3742.JPG
Here is the what she did in a couple days.IMG_3744.JPG
 

DGODGR

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Is no one checking and setting CSS everyday? That should be part of daily start-up. Nice plant BTW.
Well, we are now. At 90 hours I figured it was very early in the life of the machine, and the jaw dies. This was confirmed by the PS salesman (who has many years of crushing experience prior to becoming a salesman). To further validate that this frequent of an inspection wasn't necessary for a machine with so few hours, I had previously rented an identical unit (but with only 60 hours at beginning of rental). We rented that crusher for (2) weeks. This was on the same job, with the same rock types, same feed size (as close to same as possible), crushing to the same size as well, and we had no issues with that unit. I occasionally looked down the crushing chamber to see if the dies showed any sort of signs of wear. One could hardly see any wear to the extent that one could see down the chamber. As most of you are probably aware, one can't quite see all of the dies surfaces from the top of the chamber (due to the arc of the dies). The closed side setting (referred to as CSS by FWF above) is what one needs to check. That's the part of the die surface that is obscured when looking down the chamber.
To sum all of this anecdotal evidence up, funwithfuel is correct in what he implies in his question.....Check the CSS daily! Here is what the jaw die looked like at 120 hours (after we ran the machine for 30).
IMG_3759.JPG
Pretty weird looking isn't it? It almost looks like the die is made in layers.
Here's what it looks like removed.
IMG_3739.JPG
IMG_3740.JPG
I don't think that PS looked at the CSS after the machine came off rent from the previous renter either. They shipped a new die and made the repair without charging me. On the downside the machine was down for a week. The salesman also said that these units are shipped from the factory (when new) with the cheapest dies they can find (his words). Again, we did not have this issue previously so it makes me wonder if the previous renter was crushing down to 1.5" and maybe even loading with wet feed material that had a lot of dirt in it or something. I think it noteworthy to mention that the worn die is the static side of the chamber. The sales rep said that they normally go through (2) static dies for every (1) active die. I found that odd as my experience is usually the opposite of that. I'd be interested to hear what others have seen. Which side normally gets the most wear (active or static)?
 

DGODGR

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Here is what the CSS of the chamber looks like with the new die in there.
IMG_3741.JPG
The left side is the active die and the right is the new static jaw.
We have run the machine to 200 hours now (170 hours more than we had run the machine prior to die failure) and the unit is working well. We are now checking daily and are noticing wear, but not to that extreme.
 

funwithfuel

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What are you crushing? High silica content? That wear is coming too fast. Do you have a loader pushing material to the hoe? To be efficient, that machine wants to choked like a dirty whore. That static die should've been flipped when the active one was replaced. If it's not choked with a full feeder box all day, the jaws will show that wear. The purpose of choke feeding is to promote rock on rock crushing vs jaws crushing rock. I'm very curious what you're crushing though. That looks rough.
 

DGODGR

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What are you crushing? High silica content? That wear is coming too fast. Do you have a loader pushing material to the hoe? To be efficient, that machine wants to choked like a dirty whore. That static die should've been flipped when the active one was replaced. If it's not choked with a full feeder box all day, the jaws will show that wear. The purpose of choke feeding is to promote rock on rock crushing vs jaws crushing rock. I'm very curious what you're crushing though. That looks rough.
I don't think all that wear is from my job. Like I said before we had another PT 330 and it ran for 80 hours without the dies wearing out. The crusher has run about 70 hours since the die swap. I'll try to get a picture of the CS tomorrow. It was the static side that wore through, not the active. I didn't ask them but I don't think that they turned the active side when they installed the new static die. I think the lat photo confirms that.
Limestone, a little sandstone, gneiss, granite, Ignacio quartzite, sometimes some schist. We have it all and yes many of those rock types are high silica content.
It's funny that you mentioned the choke feeding. I took the guy that was initially feeding the jaw off of it and put my son on the feed. The first guy was letting the chamber run out and doing all sorts of weird things (in the way the he was feeding it) that I didn't like -including that he didn't have the unit level enough for my liking (feed hopper wasn't working right as it was a bit too "downhill" towards the chamber). The unit has an "auto-feed" feature for the hopper. All one has to do is keep the hopper full (being careful with feed material size) and the machine does the rest. If it senses excess pressure it will automatically slow down the feeder. This makes it easy to keep the chamber full. Once I put my son on it the loader could hardly keep pace with the out-put.
We always feed with trackhoes. It seems to me that the hopper is just a bit on the short side to feed well with our 3 yard loader.
 

63 caveman

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Well, we are now. At 90 hours I figured it was very early in the life of the machine, and the jaw dies. This was confirmed by the PS salesman (who has many years of crushing experience prior to becoming a salesman). To further validate that this frequent of an inspection wasn't necessary for a machine with so few hours, I had previously rented an identical unit (but with only 60 hours at beginning of rental). We rented that crusher for (2) weeks. This was on the same job, with the same rock types, same feed size (as close to same as possible), crushing to the same size as well, and we had no issues with that unit. I occasionally looked down the crushing chamber to see if the dies showed any sort of signs of wear. One could hardly see any wear to the extent that one could see down the chamber. As most of you are probably aware, one can't quite see all of the dies surfaces from the top of the chamber (due to the arc of the dies). The closed side setting (referred to as CSS by FWF above) is what one needs to check. That's the part of the die surface that is obscured when looking down the chamber.
To sum all of this anecdotal evidence up, funwithfuel is correct in what he implies in his question.....Check the CSS daily! Here is what the jaw die looked like at 120 hours (after we ran the machine for 30).
View attachment 248402
Pretty weird looking isn't it? It almost looks like the die is made in layers.
Here's what it looks like removed.
View attachment 248400
View attachment 248401
I don't think that PS looked at the CSS after the machine came off rent from the previous renter either. They shipped a new die and made the repair without charging me. On the downside the machine was down for a week. The salesman also said that these units are shipped from the factory (when new) with the cheapest dies they can find (his words). Again, we did not have this issue previously so it makes me wonder if the previous renter was crushing down to 1.5" and maybe even loading with wet feed material that had a lot of dirt in it or something. I think it noteworthy to mention that the worn die is the static side of the chamber. The sales rep said that they normally go through (2) static dies for every (1) active die. I found that odd as my experience is usually the opposite of that. I'd be interested to hear what others have seen. Which side normally gets the most wear (active or static)?

WOW!
The extec jaw crusher we are running will not let you close the setting that far. We flip the jaws when the ridges are down about 60% other wise we get too much +3" stuff. The jaws wear even but what is strange is the top of moving jaw wears while the bottom of stationary jaw wears.

Back to the main ?
We run an extec inpact crusher for asphalt, a Mclusky cone crusher to make 1B and 2B stuff, but the jaw crusher is the work horse. They all have high maintenance cost but the jaw get more bang per buck$.
 

funwithfuel

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Ok, so this machine has more of the automatic features than i had thought. The auto feed bed is nice to prevent bridging with large material. It can't compensate for smaller feed or running dry though. Sounds like you're already aware of the need for constant steady feed.
How are you setting and confirming CSS? A simple trick an old timer showed me. He had a roll of tin foil by his machine. Every morning he would lightly ball up a few yards and run it through the jaw on its own. Then he'd measure what came off the belt. Sandvik suggests something similar, it has flat lead plugs on wire. You lower it down the jaw while running and see what it gets squished to.
Good luck.
 

DGODGR

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WOW!
The extec jaw crusher we are running will not let you close the setting that far. We flip the jaws when the ridges are down about 60% other wise we get too much +3" stuff. The jaws wear even but what is strange is the top of moving jaw wears while the bottom of stationary jaw wears.

Back to the main ?
We run an extec inpact crusher for asphalt, a Mclusky cone crusher to make 1B and 2B stuff, but the jaw crusher is the work horse. They all have high maintenance cost but the jaw get more bang per buck$.
Interesting comment about your jaw die wear (Thanks for replying to the question). What size are you feeding and what are you reducing it to?
I don't understand your question "Back to the main?"...What are you asking?

Ok, so this machine has more of the automatic features than i had thought. The auto feed bed is nice to prevent bridging with large material. It can't compensate for smaller feed or running dry though. Sounds like you're already aware of the need for constant steady feed.
How are you setting and confirming CSS? A simple trick an old timer showed me. He had a roll of tin foil by his machine. Every morning he would lightly ball up a few yards and run it through the jaw on its own. Then he'd measure what came off the belt. Sandvik suggests something similar, it has flat lead plugs on wire. You lower it down the jaw while running and see what it gets squished to.
Good luck.
I've heard about the foil trick but not the lead plugs (What are lead plugs and where does one get them?). We just adjust the CSS until we get the output size I think I want. In fact, most times we rent a mobile crusher, we set the feed size once and then don't usually have to adjust it for the remainder of the rental period. Like I said, we have never seen this much wear in so few hours before. We don't have any spec requirement. I am just making backfill and we can also use it as structural fill (like 3" ABC/Class 2). The geotech guys are fine with it at 6" minus. Another dirt contractor working in the same subdivision usually crushes to +/-4" minus (often times looks like 5 or 6" minus to me) but I prefer to go 3" minus. There is enough rock in it that it makes very "forgiving" fill material. It also makes plenty of fines. Even if I grizzly it prior to crushing or separate the fines with the side discharge on the crusher.
Can you please elaborate on your first paragraph? I'm not sure why the crusher would have to compensate for smaller feed (In fact the crusher seems loves to chew up my hammer breakings over the shot rock. I usually prefer to run dry material instead of wet=less plugging -Maybe you meant "empty" when you said "dry"?).
 

funwithfuel

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Yes, dry meaning empty. Sandvik makes the lead testers. They're used primarily in cones but work great in jaws as well.
As far as compensating for smaller feed, just like you mentioned. Smaller feed slips through the Grizzlies onto the fines discharge. The slightly bigger stuff travels through the jaw usually on one pass, whereas the bigger slabs of shot tend to hang around a bit not run out the feeder pan so quick. If your feeder speed is set right, it'll take a lot off your backhoe. He can pace himself to the machine vs trying to keep up with ebb n flow.
 

funwithfuel

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If you're crushing for product size, you gotta check settings daily. If you're burning through a lot of high silica like Canadian black granite, you'll be checking every couple hours
 
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