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Biggest dozer to pull without having a CDL?

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JaredV

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Btw, I’m up and down the 1-40 corridor monthly and see numerous 18 wheeler wrecks. When something goes wrong you don’t think that 50,000 pound trailer is wagging that 20,000 pound tractor. That’s why they are brutal wrecks, flipped upside down, jack knived, etc…half of all tow vehicles are pulling much more than they weigh. All these 3 axle 5th wheel RV’s are double the weight of their tow vehicles.
A five axle highway tractor trailer can gross 80,000 anywhere in the US. The truck is 46-47k, the trailer is 33-34k. The truck might weigh 18k by itself, but then it takes another 1.5 times it's own weight from the trailer.
 

CM1995

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I’m not buying a two axle dump truck for 3 or 4 moves of my dozer over the 20 years I’ll own it…

Same here that's why we hire all our moves out to a local wrecker/lowbed service.

I have a friend in Ft. Worth that could and would move it for you reasonable if you will allow the scheduling. He has a Landoll slide axle and is both careful, and experienced hauling equipment.

Monte you need to hire it out and not have to worry with it. I'd PM 169 and get the guys info.

Reality is you will need to research each state's CDL and weight laws you will be traveling through. Each one can be different and more stingent than the Fed rules.

Just pay the money to have it hauled and be done with it.

There is no way on God's Green Earth I would pull 20K behind a 1 ton dually from New Mexico to Arkansas. Even if the truck could safely handle the load it's all the 4 wheelers tic-tocking, fb'ing, eating and doing everything else but have their concentration on the road that's the real problem. I drive amongst these fools everyday.
 
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skyking1

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You're sitting in a perfect case scenario for hiring the move. It's a huge can of worms when you start crossing state lines. In any case. Once you get it close to home, that's a whole another ball of wax. You can figure out local moves with your own stuff.
I'm looking at this right now with a old road grader. I could go get it with a company truck but I have to cross into Oregon, I'll bet they don't have insurance across state lines, I don't have my license set up right.
 

Montecresto

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I crossed state lines when I bought it and brought it to New Mexico. Using an F-250 diesel in those days….
 

Montecresto

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I bought a truck and trailer to move my dozer, I’d get a CDL IF that’s actually necessary….before the hassle and expense of hiring it out….
 

MG84

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And you make my point. So tell me, if one is stopped by a DOT inspector, how does he determine what your trucks GVWR is?
They will look at the door sticker (which I think is what you are alluding to), and/or trailer sticker for the GVWR and Axle Weight ratings. They will then weigh each axle reference it to the 1) Tire weight limits, 2)mfg axle weight limits, 3)gross vehicle weight, 4)state/fed axle weight limits. You will be very close to being overweight on the rear axle/tires with that load. Regardless, there is still a difference to what is 'legal' and what is 'safe' especially when we're talking about these smaller trucks.

You will need a CDL to legally move that dozer no matter what truck/trailer combo you come up with, unless it's for farm use, and then DOT is still going to hassle you when you go out of state. Also a CDL is not as easy to get as it once was, now you'll have to go to truck driver training school before they'll let you take the test. On top of that you'll probably also need a DOT physical/med card, and so on. It'd be far easier to hire it hauled if it's only on the rare occasion.
 

IceHole

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You might get by with lots of stuff.

But if you go out and wheel pack a school bus they are going to hold you to the letter of the law.

The law is federal and supersedes all state laws.

A cdl is required for any vehicle or combination of vehicles with a carrying capacity over 10,000.
Hmm. Even many 1 tons have GVWR of over 10k.
My 5500 is 19.5k and I tow a 25k trailer. I have a CDL, but not because of my pickup truck.
 

Welder Dave

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I thought they mostly go by the tire ratings. Doesn't matter what a sticker says if the tires aren't adequate. This appears to be a case of someone asking a question and not liking the answers so they somehow try to change the narrative to suit their way of thinking. 26,500lbs. behind a 1 ton is a bad idea.
 

Willie B

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Latest Ford pickup is single rear. Tow rating is 19500.

Nope, math won't work. I believe VT says trailer GVW rate + Truck actual weight over 16000. A trailer rated for 10001 LB behind a truck 16000 actual requires CDL. Or total scale weight over 26000.
 
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Willie B

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I thought they mostly go by the tire ratings. Doesn't matter what a sticker says if the tires aren't adequate. This appears to be a case of someone asking a question and not liking the answers so they somehow try to change the narrative to suit their way of thinking. 26,500lbs. behind a 1 ton is a bad idea.
I would be surprised if DMV has a chart of tow rating for each truck. Whether you are exceeding your tow rating would have to be extreme if DMV were to pursue that fine. They have others. Vermont says any trailer over 10,000 LBS requires CDL. A few pages later, the truck actual weight plus trailer rated weight must be over 26000 to require CDL.
I drove a truck titled 25999 with air brakes a number of years. No fine, I don't know if they could have. I then got a class A CDL. I don't believe I am limited as to tow rating. I've questioned, haven't got an answer. If I exceed trailer GVWR, I get a violation. If I exceed rear axle rating of the truck I get a violation. No one seems able to tell me the tow rating of my truck.
 

MG84

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I would be surprised if DMV has a chart of tow rating for each truck. Whether you are exceeding your tow rating would have to be extreme if DMV were to pursue that fine. They have others. Vermont says any trailer over 10,000 LBS requires CDL. A few pages later, the truck actual weight plus trailer rated weight must be over 26000 to require CDL.
I drove a truck titled 25999 with air brakes a number of years. No fine, I don't know if they could have. I then got a class A CDL. I don't believe I am limited as to tow rating. I've questioned, haven't got an answer. If I exceed trailer GVWR, I get a violation. If I exceed rear axle rating of the truck I get a violation. No one seems able to tell me the tow rating of my truck.
GCWR (tow ratings) are sometimes difficult to figure out for medium and heavy trucks where there can be literally dozens of engine, transmission, axle ratio etc combinations for a given truck. Most modern (80's to present) diesel powered/air brake class 7 trucks have a GCWR of around 50K, some setup as a semi tractor upwards of 60K. Given our steep/bad roads, ~40K gross combined weight is as heavy as I like to load mine.
 

Mcrafty1

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I dont see the problem, Im legal at 25800, why wouldn't you want me on the road.
If 25,800 is gross weight, and I believe it is..... the pickup/trailer combo is going to weight at or around at least 10,000. You're pushing the limit with the 450 dozer.
 

Willie B

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37000 Gross is the most I have hauled. That is low gear, 2000 RPM, 10 or less MPH up some of the hills around here.
Younger generation has done some STUPID stuff I didn't find out until after the fact. One of the extra sons had my old truck 427 gas engine, 5 speed with two speed rear axle. He was towing a telehandler (20,000 LB on a borrowed trailer. Dugway Road South Wallingford is 1 lane & very steep, I'll guess 20% grade. Gravel road he was climbing, & spun out. Trying to back down, front wheels kept sliding sideways. He called Seth. It took Seth 1/2 hour to go the long way around with a 4x4 2500 & tow him up the hill. Said his legs had turned to jelly. Didn't dare turn off the engine, he needed air for the brakes.
 

Willie B

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Hmm. Even many 1 tons have GVWR of over 10k.
My 5500 is 19.5k and I tow a 25k trailer. I have a CDL, but not because of my pickup truck.
I do not consider a 5500 a one ton. A 3500 is what I think of as a 1 ton. A single wheel 3500 has a tow rating under 20,000. A modern John Deere 450_ will weigh near 19000. With trailer you'd be over tow rating & well over CDL required.
 

KSSS

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I would not have an issue hauling that locally as I do haul a similar weight on a similar set up. I would not try crossing numerous State lines doing that. Regardless of what anyone says, DOT laws are sometimes subjective, just as pointed out, you can ask difficult DOT questions to 10 DOT officers and get 5 different opinions. I would not want that kind of hassle in my life, and would hire it hauled to your location. Especially since it wouldn't cost that much to have hauled.
 

Montecresto

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They will look at the door sticker (which I think is what you are alluding to), and/or trailer sticker for the GVWR and Axle Weight ratings. They will then weigh each axle reference it to the 1) Tire weight limits, 2)mfg axle weight limits, 3)gross vehicle weight, 4)state/fed axle weight limits. You will be very close to being overweight on the rear axle/tires with that load. Regardless, there is still a difference to what is 'legal' and what is 'safe' especially when we're talking about these smaller trucks.

You will need a CDL to legally move that dozer no matter what truck/trailer combo you come up with, unless it's for farm use, and then DOT is still going to hassle you when you go out of state. Also a CDL is not as easy to get as it once was, now you'll have to go to truck driver training school before they'll let you take the test. On top of that you'll probably also need a DOT physical/med card, and so on. It'd be far easier to hire it hauled if it's only on the rare occasion.
So they’re going to look at the sticker placed on the truck by the manufacturer who you said pulled a number out of their ass to see whether I’m overweight or not…..OK.
 

Montecresto

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did you figure a route out that avoided the scales?
Yes, but not because my load won’t be legal. The manufacturers stickers on the truck and trailer cover my load. Of course there’s apparently a conflict on the whole sticker issue…..
 
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