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Mobile crusher

suladas

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Jun 30, 2016
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Have a 20,000 sq/ft pad to remove with heating lines in it and foam underneath, so no recycle places wants it, and being about 45 mins out of town, trucking isn't cheap. I can rent a Red Rhino 7000+ jaw crusher that will cost me about what it would to truck the material away, and the customer is ok with leaving the crushed material onsite.

Has anyone used a unit like this before that they can actually do decent production? The claim of 45 tons an hour seems pretty impressive. Slab is 4-5" thick so about 500 tons to crush, and i'm figuring even if it takes it 25 hours to crush i'm fine with that. I would be aiming for under 2" material.

Is the plastic going to cause any issues with the crusher? Pad also has mesh. I've asked these questions to the place that rents it and they said it's ok, but at $11k to get the thing for a week I want to be 100% sure it's going to get the job done.

https://redrhinocrushers.co.uk/products/rr-7000-plus-series/
 

Tags

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Feb 19, 2012
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Connecticut
I have never used one, but I would guarantee that the plastic, insulation, and the 2” size you want will not yield 45 tph. Pretty sure the Red rhino will only take pieces that are smaller than a standard concrete block, 8”x16”. Also, I believe that 45 tph quote is at the largest setting of the jaws, I think that’s about a 4”- product. I looked at one of those units many years ago, the numbers just didn’t seem to work.
 

02SILVER

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Apr 5, 2011
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72
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Florida
I just acquired a very similar unit for processing my own material. I think that the foam and plastic will be a major down fall as it will cause the feed material to slip against the jaws making terrible jams. I have seen this happen with random clumps of grass and root material accidentally entering the jaws. Also I would say the feed material would need to be processed to about 12" to not jam up and make decent tonnage. 45 tph seems too high at 2" minus, I am running concrete and limestone rock to 1" minus and get 20-25tph. My 2 cents, hope this helps
 

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suladas

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Canada
Found another place who has one, and it's in my city instead of 5 hours away and it's the same one as above I think, so not needing to pay $4k in trucking or lose a day each way moving it. The rental place said they are getting 40tph crushing to 3" on the red rhino, the komplet claiming 110tph at any size seems insane. As long as it'll do even 15tph and not constantly jamming from foam i'd be fine with that. My plan was to make sure it's reasonable small while pulling up the pad, then as i'm loading with my 210 I will have some time to further break the odd large piece and try to separate as much foam as I can. The heating lines on the tiny part of the slab I pulled up are right in the center, so i'd imagine they wouldn't cause any issues? They are 1" lines spaced about 10" apart.

https://www.groundworx.ca/equipment-rentals/new-2020-komplet-k-jc704/
 

Tugger2

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Mar 22, 2018
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British Columbia
Id be wary of the foam as your pulling the slab apart. Any time we have demoed materials with foam its added considerable time to cleanup . The foam breaks down into beads that the wind will spread all over or water will float away.Ive had to cleanup wreckage from concrete floats that were built around foam ,it can be as bad as an oil spill without the right plan in place.
How small do you have to break the concrete down to leave on site ? Can plastics and foam be left with the crushed concrete?
While doing ship demo last year the concrete fines and foam fines mixed were very expensive to dispose of.
Ive had foundation walls done with a concrete shear on the excavator .worked pretty well and nicely sorted the steel for scrap.
Or you go dark ages and put some lexan windows in your excavator and find an old wrecking ball and just bust the stuff up.
 

suladas

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Jun 30, 2016
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Canada
Id be wary of the foam as your pulling the slab apart. Any time we have demoed materials with foam its added considerable time to cleanup . The foam breaks down into beads that the wind will spread all over or water will float away.Ive had to cleanup wreckage from concrete floats that were built around foam ,it can be as bad as an oil spill without the right plan in place.
How small do you have to break the concrete down to leave on site ? Can plastics and foam be left with the crushed concrete?
While doing ship demo last year the concrete fines and foam fines mixed were very expensive to dispose of.
Ive had foundation walls done with a concrete shear on the excavator .worked pretty well and nicely sorted the steel for scrap.
Or you go dark ages and put some lexan windows in your excavator and find an old wrecking ball and just bust the stuff up.

They ideally want it 2" or under and then they are ok with all material just being spread back out on the site, they do not care about the foam being mixed in, although my plan was to remove as much as possible. Thankfully the site is surrounded by bare land on all sides and it's on a reserve so no homeowners, etc to worry about complaining. The plan for the site after is put 6" of topsoil on it and let grass grow. A shear did cross my mind, but I was thinking it would be way too time consuming breaking it that small.

The problem is i'm already into the job. I subbed it from another company and took their word on a few details and missed the heating lines so the crusher was a solution to get the job done cheaper, and they are willing to pay extra to remove slab before spring, but other then that i'm already locked into a price and trying to make it so I don't lose my shirt on the job.
 

92U 3406

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How about one of these?

I don't think the foam would inhibit it too much. Its just a bucket with a fixed jaw plate on the floor and a vibrating jaw plate on top. Adjustable for different size materials as well.
 

suladas

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How about one of these?

I don't think the foam would inhibit it too much. Its just a bucket with a fixed jaw plate on the floor and a vibrating jaw plate on top. Adjustable for different size materials as well.

I considered that also but haven't found anyone to rent one. I emailed arrowwest who can bring them in to buy, or they said possibly rent if it's a long enough rental, but I doubt a week is enough. I would bet to buy they are over $50k.

I was also curious about a pulverizer https://www.amiattachments.com/product/kraken-concrete-pulverizer/ I think it would break it down no problem, but I wonder if it would still be fairly big pieces in the 3-4" range?

There was also these that sell at ritchie's for under $3k https://www.kijiji.ca/v-view-details.html?adId=1644725651 1 job like this would more then pay for it.
 

DGODGR

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Dec 18, 2009
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I have a bucket crusher (I use it on either of my 20+ ton excavators) and it is a simple jaw. No matter what crusher you employ the feed size will certainly have an impact on output production. If shooting for 2"- output I'd say you will be lucky to get 10 YPH with a bucket crusher. Even on a track mounted mobile crusher, the larger slabs fall in at weird angles and will want to wedge in there. The larger opening of a larger crusher will certainly minimize that and let you get away with larger reduction ratios. The other thing that I fear might slow production is the foam and the tubing. I know it may not make much sense but those are soft materials. They will consume energy and inhibit the crushing action. A high speed impactor might mitigate that some (they are usually a preferred crusher type for recycling concrete anyway).
In my opinion the pulverizer/processor (like you linked above) are great for sizing crusher feed but I don't see how you could efficiently get all your material to 2"- with one of those.
I'm a detail guy, so when you say that the owner says it's okay to crush and leave on-site, I get a bit nervous. I don't think he pictures those little blue foam pieces blowing all over God's creation when he told you that. I'd bet that this will happen, and I shudder to think how many man hours it will take to rectify that situation after the fact.
 

suladas

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Joined
Jun 30, 2016
Messages
1,731
Location
Canada
I have a bucket crusher (I use it on either of my 20+ ton excavators) and it is a simple jaw. No matter what crusher you employ the feed size will certainly have an impact on output production. If shooting for 2"- output I'd say you will be lucky to get 10 YPH with a bucket crusher. Even on a track mounted mobile crusher, the larger slabs fall in at weird angles and will want to wedge in there. The larger opening of a larger crusher will certainly minimize that and let you get away with larger reduction ratios. The other thing that I fear might slow production is the foam and the tubing. I know it may not make much sense but those are soft materials. They will consume energy and inhibit the crushing action. A high speed impactor might mitigate that some (they are usually a preferred crusher type for recycling concrete anyway).
In my opinion the pulverizer/processor (like you linked above) are great for sizing crusher feed but I don't see how you could efficiently get all your material to 2"- with one of those.
I'm a detail guy, so when you say that the owner says it's okay to crush and leave on-site, I get a bit nervous. I don't think he pictures those little blue foam pieces blowing all over God's creation when he told you that. I'd bet that this will happen, and I shudder to think how many man hours it will take to rectify that situation after the fact.

It's good to hear from someone who's used one. They are actually worried about it being crushed too small so they said 3" now, which should help speed a lot. I have found a MB crusher bucket to rent for $2k for a week, even if it takes 50 hours to crush it i'm still fine. No one will rent a mobile crusher for less then a month now, all too busy.

They know there is foam under the slab and heating lines in it and I have confirmation in writing that the material will stay on site, we will do our best to remove all foam/heating lines but no guarantees. It may be a problem in the end, but at this point I think it's still the best option. My plan is pull up slab and pile it while leaving as much foam in tact as I can then clean up the foam and continue to get as much foam as I can out of it as i'm crushing and spreading it. Even if I hauled it away without crushing it, the foam would still be a huge nightmare trying to clean up, I don't think there's anyway to avoid it.

I would prefer to haul it away still but haven't found anyone willing to take it aside from the landfill at $75/ton.
 
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suladas

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Jun 30, 2016
Messages
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Location
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I have a bucket crusher (I use it on either of my 20+ ton excavators) and it is a simple jaw. No matter what crusher you employ the feed size will certainly have an impact on output production. If shooting for 2"- output I'd say you will be lucky to get 10 YPH with a bucket crusher. Even on a track mounted mobile crusher, the larger slabs fall in at weird angles and will want to wedge in there. The larger opening of a larger crusher will certainly minimize that and let you get away with larger reduction ratios. The other thing that I fear might slow production is the foam and the tubing. I know it may not make much sense but those are soft materials. They will consume energy and inhibit the crushing action. A high speed impactor might mitigate that some (they are usually a preferred crusher type for recycling concrete anyway).
In my opinion the pulverizer/processor (like you linked above) are great for sizing crusher feed but I don't see how you could efficiently get all your material to 2"- with one of those.
I'm a detail guy, so when you say that the owner says it's okay to crush and leave on-site, I get a bit nervous. I don't think he pictures those little blue foam pieces blowing all over God's creation when he told you that. I'd bet that this will happen, and I shudder to think how many man hours it will take to rectify that situation after the fact.

I see you have the same crusher bucket i'm going to rent. Curious how big of rock will it crush? Would it be able to handle like 8"-10" boulders?
 

DGODGR

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It's good to hear from someone who's used one. They are actually worried about it being crushed too small so they said 3" now, which should help speed a lot. I have found a MB crusher bucket to rent for $2k for a week, even if it takes 50 hours to crush it i'm still fine. No one will rent a mobile crusher for less then a month now, all too busy.
Does this include jaw die wear?
How worn are the jaw dies?
Which size bucket is it? If it's an MB crusher it will be a BF"___"(insert number here).
What is your carrier (make, model, and year)?
Do you have a case drain on your carrier? MBs require one.
What type of connectors do you have on your auxiliary lines?
Who will set up your machine to ensure required flow rate at required pressure?
What top mount is on the crusher bucket?...Will your carrier accept that mount?

They know there is foam under the slab and heating lines in it and I have confirmation in writing that the material will stay on site, we will do our best to remove all foam/heating lines but no guarantees. It may be a problem in the end, but at this point I think it's still the best option. My plan is pull up slab and pile it while leaving as much foam in tact as I can then clean up the foam and continue to get as much foam as I can out of it as i'm crushing and spreading it. Even if I hauled it away without crushing it, the foam would still be a huge nightmare trying to clean up, I don't think there's anyway to avoid it.
Good point. Just wanted to be sure you thought about the foam pieces floating around.

I would prefer to haul it away still but haven't found anyone willing to take it aside from the landfill at $75/ton.
Damn! If that's what it costs to dump concrete debris you should buy a crusher and charge $50/ton to dump. Then you crush it into 3"- and sell it back to them. That's how you make money!

In your original post you said that you calculated 500 tons. If you have 20k s.f. x 5" thick that works out to be about 308 yards. Once you break it the material swells. I would assume it would be around 460 yards to run through the crusher.


I see you have the same crusher bucket i'm going to rent. Curious how big of rock will it crush? Would it be able to handle like 8"-10" boulders?
Not a simple answer (unfortunately)....
Which specific model are you renting?
What type of "rock" you will be feeding?
What size are you trying to crush to?

I forgot to ask....What type of reinforcement does the slab have in it?
 

DGODGR

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It's good to hear from someone who's used one. They are actually worried about it being crushed too small so they said 3" now, which should help speed a lot. I have found a MB crusher bucket to rent for $2k for a week, even if it takes 50 hours to crush it i'm still fine.
You haven't said what they might be worried about, but some rock will create too much fines when crushed. The smaller you go, the worse this condition can get. If your just spreading around the site my guess is they are concerned about silicates in the dust. Concrete will make lots of fines when crushing small, and create lots of "bad" dust. You may be wise to have someone with a hose to wet the output. MB has a spray bar as an option but I have no experience with it. Seems to me that things would certainly get harder of one must be tethered to a hose while trying to work.
It's better all the way around going to 3" minus instead of 2"minus. You can get to 2"- with a bucket crusher but you'd struggle to get there with any sort of track mounted jaw. Really any track mount unless it was a closed circuit unit (has screens and can send the oversized back through the crusher). Even 3"- is hard to get to with a 100k# jaw crusher.
 

suladas

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Jun 30, 2016
Messages
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Location
Canada
Does this include jaw die wear?
How worn are the jaw dies?
Which size bucket is it? If it's an MB crusher it will be a BF"___"(insert number here).
What is your carrier (make, model, and year)?
Do you have a case drain on your carrier? MBs require one.
What type of connectors do you have on your auxiliary lines?
Who will set up your machine to ensure required flow rate at required pressure?
What top mount is on the crusher bucket?...Will your carrier accept that mount?


Good point. Just wanted to be sure you thought about the foam pieces floating around.


Damn! If that's what it costs to dump concrete debris you should buy a crusher and charge $50/ton to dump. Then you crush it into 3"- and sell it back to them. That's how you make money!

In your original post you said that you calculated 500 tons. If you have 20k s.f. x 5" thick that works out to be about 308 yards. Once you break it the material swells. I would assume it would be around 460 yards to run through the crusher.



Not a simple answer (unfortunately)....
Which specific model are you renting?
What type of "rock" you will be feeding?
What size are you trying to crush to?

I forgot to ask....What type of reinforcement does the slab have in it?

There was no mention about wear, but another place was $1500/month for wear, so i'd assume like $500 more for wear. I can't say for sure but I think it's a new one. It's a 70.2 s4 going on my 2008 Volvo EC210C. I have to confirm for sure but i'm pretty sure as I can select sheer mode which I think is the right one to run it? I can change flow rate on my screen and the machines flow rate exceeds what the bucket says. Yep confirmed it's a 200 series wbm. I still have to check the connections, I don't have my thumb lines teed off so i'm going to have to disconnect my thumb regardless and if I have to hard line it, i'm not too worried, I might take it on/off 2 times at most.

You can dump concrete for free here but they won't accept any kind of plastic, and it's impossible to try and separate enough out, that's why I can't find anyone to take it. Normally it's no problem to get rid of it.

I have no idea what kind of rock, this job says they have a pile of rock they wanted crushed at the same time if I can and just said it's like 8"-10" boulders. They want to be able to use it for road base, so i'd say 3" would be fine. It's something where when I am on site I can give some a try, if it works great if not it's no loss. I was mostly wondering if I should leave room in my schedule to stay there for the rock, it seems pretty ambitious to think it could crush that big of rock though.

There is mesh in the slab also, I considered renting the magnet for it but then I looked at how it worked and it seems like it's way too slow for any benefit. I'll just separate it best I can and make sure there is no metal sticking up at the end. If I have a day at the end with a skidsteer cleaning it up better from metal/foam that's not an issue.
 
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suladas

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You haven't said what they might be worried about, but some rock will create too much fines when crushed. The smaller you go, the worse this condition can get. If your just spreading around the site my guess is they are concerned about silicates in the dust. Concrete will make lots of fines when crushing small, and create lots of "bad" dust. You may be wise to have someone with a hose to wet the output. MB has a spray bar as an option but I have no experience with it. Seems to me that things would certainly get harder of one must be tethered to a hose while trying to work.
It's better all the way around going to 3" minus instead of 2"minus. You can get to 2"- with a bucket crusher but you'd struggle to get there with any sort of track mounted jaw. Really any track mount unless it was a closed circuit unit (has screens and can send the oversized back through the crusher). Even 3"- is hard to get to with a 100k# jaw crusher.

They want it spread on the site to backfill it from the demolition, but if there is good enough stuff to use some for road base. There is about 3000 sq/ft hole 3' down where I can get rid of a lot of the material and put the worst there. They are planning to put topsoil on the area in the spring and let grass grow, so any dust would not be an issue for very long. I wasn't going to do anything about dust, being winter the last thing I want to mess around with is water. There is nothing around the site for at least 500' in all directions. Yea I like the idea of as big as possible, not just for dust but to make it faster.
 

colson04

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Apr 11, 2016
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Delton, Michigan
A water separator would separate the foam and plastic bits from the concrete. I have no idea where one of those would be rented though.

We use one in our dairy operation to reclaim the freestall bedding sand from the manure slurry. The slurry gets pumped into the top of the separator with a lot of water and agitation. The sand settles out and is augered off the bottom. The manure solids float and are skimmed off the top. What comes out is almost like pure beach sand.

I could see a work flow at your site that includes hosing down the material before, during and after crushing. Run through a separator to extract the foam and plastic from the crushed concrete and steel wire mesh. Magnet to extract mesh from crush. Foam and plastic loaded to a 40 yard can and sent to landfill.


I know this is probably a moot point now, but might help someone else plan for this type of job in the future.
 

DGODGR

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There was no mention about wear, but another place was $1500/month for wear, so i'd assume like $500 more for wear. I can't say for sure but I think it's a new one. It's a 70.2 s4 going on my 2008 Volvo EC210C. I have to confirm for sure but i'm pretty sure as I can select sheer mode which I think is the right one to run it? I can change flow rate on my screen and the machines flow rate exceeds what the bucket says. Yep confirmed it's a 200 series wbm. I still have to check the connections, I don't have my thumb lines teed off so i'm going to have to disconnect my thumb regardless and if I have to hard line it, i'm not too worried, I might take it on/off 2 times at most.
The BF70 you are talking about is a newer version than the one I used to have. I got rid of my BF 70 and now have an 80. The BF80 has a slightly larger feed side opening but it seems to make a noticeable difference in what input size it accepts with out stalling, and output as well. I don't think that you will see more than 10 yph with the BF70. Your Volvo will have plenty of HP and flow to run the tool but it has to be at the correct pressure for the HP to pass to the tool. If memory serves, this will be about 60 gpm at 3,200 psi. I would think that your machine is capable of this but I'm not sure if your settings can account for this within the monitor. I think that the biggest issue will be if you need to engage/activate both hydraulic pumps to get that many GPMs at that high of pressure. That may require some know-how and entering the "service" side of the monitor.

I have no idea what kind of rock, this job says they have a pile of rock they wanted crushed at the same time if I can and just said it's like 8"-10" boulders. They want to be able to use it for road base, so i'd say 3" would be fine. It's something where when I am on site I can give some a try, if it works great if not it's no loss. I was mostly wondering if I should leave room in my schedule to stay there for the rock, it seems pretty ambitious to think it could crush that big of rock though.
MB first told me that "If the rock fits in the opening, it will crush", but then changed their tune to 50% of the jaw opening height after I bought the crusher. The '70 jaw is 29" wide x 20" tall. With their logic a 10" rock is the biggest that you should put in there. The weird thing is that the BF80 has the same height, but is 5.5" wider, will produce more yards per hour, and has much less tendency to stall. Regardless, I will size my rock to about 8" minus. I am not running through a grizzly, or getting out to measure. I just hammer it to what looks like a good size. Without knowing what type of rock you're up against I can't say, for sure, how much success you will have. I believe that the rock will probably crush. It will probably be a question as to how many hot stalls you will encounter, how long the larger rocks will rumble around in the chamber before you get them to crush, and how long it will take to un-clog the machine. Sometimes the rocks that don't want to get crushed will shoot out of the chamber too. All these things can add to the time it takes to get the job done.

There is mesh in the slab also, I considered renting the magnet for it but then I looked at how it worked and it seems like it's way too slow for any benefit. I'll just separate it best I can and make sure there is no metal sticking up at the end. If I have a day at the end with a skidsteer cleaning it up better from metal/foam that's not an issue.
I'd rather have rebar than wire mesh. The wire mesh is likely to put holes in your tires if your handling the output with something that is rubber tired. Probably not a big deal for =/> a 3 yard loader, but it will give grief to skid steer and backhoe tires.
 
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