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Order assembled chains and pads or transfer? Ec140blc

92U 3406

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Jan 3, 2017
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I'd swap the pads onto new rails. A motivated twosome could knock that job out in a day, day and a half.
 

RTS8809

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Mar 18, 2023
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CT
I guess I was just wondering what causes the bushing to explode like so many of mine are. But I guess they were just at the very end of their life. A little too much slop in the sprocket, a strategically placed rock right?

Swapping the bushings and pins would make sense if the chains were a little more expensive. At 1500 a piece, I can't imagine replacing parts would end up being much cheaper due to the labor. I could be wrong?

And yes I decided to save the 5400 and swap the pads. Alone, with a one inch gun, a torch and a small pry bar It was less than a full day job to yank the pads. I made one socket last the entire job too!
 

funwithfuel

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Mar 7, 2017
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Will county Illinois
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You're doing all the bottom rollers too. Good for you, not cutting critical corners. That ought to give you a good long life as long as you don't let her set up.
 

RTS8809

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Mar 18, 2023
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Location
CT
Yes, rollers and the idlers. I hate doing things twice lol.

Yanking that idler, do you think if I pull the blade up I'll be able to slide it out with the tensioner in one piece? Or will I have to pull have way and unbolt the tensioner? I ran out of steam and haven't tried.
 

RTS8809

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Nige, yes I bought a pile of flap discs and wire wheels. I figured I'd mount the chains then buzz the paint off of the tops so I'm not doing it on my knees.

Wire wheel and smooth out the back of the pads too.
 

funwithfuel

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If memory serves, that whole assembly should slide right on outta there. Just be mindful when bolting up your new idler to clock the zirk on the tensioner where you want it. I've seen guys, in a hurry, slap it in , seat it, pull the chain together and pin it only to find the zirk is 180° out from where she needs to be. Looks like you're being diligent every step of the way. Nice job.
 

Shimmy1

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Aug 14, 2014
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North Dakota
If you had more than one machine or could have afforded the downtime, I would have suggested having the bushings turned or replaced. That's really all that goes bad. It's not like the links actually stretch.

FWF, you are the first one I've seen on here that has suggested investing anything in fixing excavator rails. At $1400 per rail, I just put new ITR on our 210 last winter. It is a little early to tell, only about 500 hours on them, but the machine rides a little rough. I replaced everything except the top rollers. Idler slides were worn a little, but not terrible. When I say it rides rough, it's like a washboard effect. It's the worst on a hard surface, never really goes away in a soft field. Only tightened the rails once in 500 hours so they seem to be wearing ok.
 

funwithfuel

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Will county Illinois
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FWF, you are the first one I've seen on here that has suggested investing anything in fixing excavator rails. At $1400 per rail, I just put new ITR on our 210 last winter. It is a little early to tell, only about 500 hours on them, but the machine rides a little rough. I replaced everything except the top rollers. Idler slides were worn a little, but not terrible. When I say it rides rough, it's like a washboard effect. It's the worst on a hard surface, never really goes away in a soft field. Only tightened the rails once in 500 hours so they seem to be wearing ok.
I just remember when chinesium wasn't the answer to everything. We had a local shop down in Lowell. Hardings was the name. Best place in the midwest for all things undercarriage. They were competitive with new vs rebuilt. I'd rather invest in a man's labor than support a country that hates me.
It's one thing if you're in a sand pit changing tracks n idlers every year or so, but if you're making the investment in 'you're equipment, don't you want the best value for dollar? Maybe I'm just too damned old.
 
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