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Rebuilding Deere 1810E scraper

earthscratcher

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Joined
Sep 27, 2008
Messages
338
Location
iowa
Occupation
excavating contractor
I have enerpac, simplex, and otc, couple cheap vevors, any body try temco have there hydraulic over air pump it works good, they have a five year warranty. there is a 60 ton rebuilt on ebay 300 its only a four inch stroke though.
 

crane operator

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Mar 27, 2009
Messages
8,315
Location
sw missouri
I have enerpac, simplex, and otc, couple cheap vevors, any body try temco have there hydraulic over air pump it works good, they have a five year warranty. there is a 60 ton rebuilt on ebay 300 its only a four inch stroke though.
I have two temco toe jacks. One works great, the other one is kind of dicky. It won't release down consistently. I didn't know they had a five year warranty, I'll look into that. I just usually smack it hard with a three pound hammer and it will start to let off.
 

earthscratcher

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Sep 27, 2008
Messages
338
Location
iowa
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excavating contractor
that rebuilt one on ebay is 380 not 300,but a brand new one is 570.00, it said 5 year warranty from an American name . NON-GENERIC what is that ? sounds fishy
 

OzDozer

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Jan 18, 2007
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Location
Perth, Western Australia.
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Semi-Retired ..
I can recall about 25 yrs ago, when there were businesses that still repaired jacks (they're nearly all gone now) - I called into a hyd jack repair business to inquire about re-sealing a 12 ton Blackhawk jack I owned.
Behind the counter there was a pile of virtually new Snap-On floor jacks. Upon questioning the shop owner, it turned out Snap-On had got them made in China.

But the Chinese had fitted cheap-a** seals and o-rings - seals made from hard PVC and o-rings made from raw rubber - instead of the proper seal and o-ring materials, such as nylon, teflon, urethane and NBR.

Every single one of the jacks was under 6 mths old, and had been returned under warranty to be repaired with decent-quality seals and o-rings.

It was costing Snap-On a fortune, the shop owner told me - and it was obviously one of those deals where Snap-On had left the QC and the meeting of materials specifications, entirely up to the Chinese manufacturer, without any Snap-On management oversight. A hard earned lesson for Snap-On.
 

farmerlund

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Joined
Nov 22, 2014
Messages
1,237
Location
North Dakota
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Farmer/ excavator
Have you used those enough to know if they are actually standard tons, or metric? A 30T if metric would actually be 33 tons in our world.
The 60T will break the 1" grade 8 treaded rod from McMaster-carr. It takes one heck of a good anchor point on whatever is being pulled. I don't really have anything to compare them to.
 

1693TA

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Feb 27, 2010
Messages
2,687
Location
Farmington IL
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FAA Radar Engineer, (Retired)
This is a 10T ram pulling a 1.75" boom telescoping cylinder anchor pin on a manlift last summer at my shop. The 3/4" grade 8 rod, and nut from McMaster did well. Couldn't use a lot of heat in the area of the frozen pin that ran through the base of the cylinder because the counterbalance valves were right there on the underside and out of reach. A 10 ton ram was not enough pulling force by itself but a little persuasion via 12# sledge on the other end with a drift helped.. Once that pin broke free, it removed fairly easy by tapping with a hammer and drift from the other side.

Not a grease zerk one and the owner said it creaked and groaned every time the boom was actuated.

Stuck pin:

20230821_100017.jpg20230821_101356.jpg
Drift to pound on:

20230821_081909.jpg

That pin was rusty it's entire length. I had the machine shop open the hole and bush the bore back to the 1.750" dimention and fitted a new pin. It worked silky smooth when going back together.
 
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Shimmy1

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Aug 14, 2014
Messages
4,316
Location
North Dakota
More fun. She is 2/3 of the way disassembled. One of the gate cylinder pins really tried our patience. We rigged the 55 ton ram, kept steady pressure on it for 5 hours. We heated it, let it cool, heated a second time, let the red get out and then I wrapped it as best I could with wet paper towels, and kept them saturated with ice water. After we figured it was as cool as we could get it without wasting any more time, we fired both torches up and focused on one side, trying to get a smaller area red instead of warm the entire pin boss. As we were heating, we were hitting the pedal on the air pump to make sure we had full pressure in the cylinder. I was about 1 minute from calling it quits when that damn pin finally gave, jumping about a 1/4" in one go with a bang that made us all pucker a bit, and we had it on the run. Pulling the tongue off tomorrow.
IMG_20240112_163255177.jpgIMG_20240112_163304076.jpgIMG_20240112_163310986.jpgIMG_20240112_163326858.jpg
 

Shimmy1

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Aug 14, 2014
Messages
4,316
Location
North Dakota
Got the last two pins pushed out today. What seems to work the best is two torches, heat everything as hot as possible with BTUs available, then go home for the day. Next morning, get cylinder in place, pressure up, and fire both torches up. Concentrate heat on one side, about a 2" band. Keep tickling the pump to make sure cylinder is maxed out. About the time you're ready to give up, that stupid thing will pop, move about a half-inch that first time with a bang about like a pistol shot and scare the sh!t out of you. Keep pumping and you'll get it on the run.


Screenshot_20240209-224549.png
Screenshot_20240209-222852~2.pngScreenshot_20240209-223017~2.pngScreenshot_20240209-222621~2.png
 

Shimmy1

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Joined
Aug 14, 2014
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4,316
Location
North Dakota
A short list of things we've done between the three so far.

Re-pinned and bushed hitch assembly.
Rebuilt cylinders.
Re-bushed cylinder bosses.
Re-bushed tongue to main frame pivot points.
Rebuilt gate cutting edge, including structure.
Replaced pin bosses for gate hinge.
Straightened and reinforced ejector slide rails.
Rebuilt ejector tail rollers.
Tightened wheel bearings.
Built custom masts for GPS.

I'll get some pics tomorrow. I thought I knew pretty much all there is to know about these pans before this winter. Straightening those ejector rails was pretty simple, and satisfying because we added a brace that my 2008 model has that neither of the other two did.
 

earthscratcher

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Joined
Sep 27, 2008
Messages
338
Location
iowa
Occupation
excavating contractor
let us know how the aluminum holds up, should be sweet, way lighter. see your running the flat track cats to pull those units, good rigs,bullet proof trannys, don't make them like they used to.

just think how many yds those pans have pulled in there life time. might not exceed what's in the dam at fort peck but I am sure its a bunch.in the right dirt there is no better way to move earth!
 

Shimmy1

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Aug 14, 2014
Messages
4,316
Location
North Dakota
My confidence in the decision to run these tractors is starting to slip slightly. I have been hearing bits and pieces of parts for the differential not being available. A guy I know ran his 85 out of oil in the diff. Spent $32k and needed to find a bunch of used parts to complete the repair.

Couple years ago I had a tension cylinder leaking. I inquired about buying new parts and building one to have a spare, since I couldn't buy one complete. I was informed that the only parts I could buy for one is seal kits, rods, and some other bits and pieces. Cat has also quit building drivers and idler wheels. I'm not sure what I'll be pulling these pans with in 10 years, but it won't be a quadtrac.
 

JaredV

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Joined
Jan 22, 2022
Messages
349
Location
SW WA
Time to start rolling your own. Tracks from this, engine from that, transmission from there, cab from here, next thing you know you're getting calls from other guys wanting one.
 

OzDozer

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Jan 18, 2007
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2,207
Location
Perth, Western Australia.
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Semi-Retired ..
It's not that hard to do - a number of Australian guys built sizeable numbers of "home-built" tractors that were laughed at by the highly sophisticated Red, Green and Yellow tractor manufacturers - but these locally-built tractors got good support from their buyers - and their sales bit into the big brands sales.

These local tractor names are well-known to Australian farmers - Upton Tractors, Phillips Acremaster, Waltanna, Baldwin, Chamberlain.
Unfortunately, they all died out, due to either problems with sourcing components, pressure from the big American manufacturers, or from simply being bought up by the U.S. manufacturers.

There's a real need to simplify tractors today, and to get away from the ever-increasing requirement for factory technical specialists, and specialised equipment to repair them.

The Green tractor manufacturer has gained no friends amongst its end-users with their claims that their electronic technology is patented and cannot be worked on by independent repairers, changed, or replaced with aftermarket parts, without the Green tractor company effectively cutting off the tractor owner and leaving them stranded.

It will blow up in their face eventually, I don't think they have even started to understand the level of anger amongst owners who cannot do anything to their tractors, without manufacturer approval.

As one tractor owner stated, "I bought this tractor, I own it, I should be able to choose how I repair it, modify it, or do what I like with it, without facing manufacturer threats of lawsuits or withdrawal of support and parts supply".

The main problem with building your own tractor is ensuring continuity of supply of engines and drivetrain components.
With electrification increasing, this will lead to many manufacturers abandoning the manufacture of transmissions, and maybe even diesel engines, within a decade or two.
 

Jakebreak

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Dec 5, 2016
Messages
273
Location
Bakersfield Ca
Occupation
operator/pipelayer/mechanic
Looking good how come you won’t run quad tracks with those pans. Also keep an eye out at auctions or ag listings here in California for farmers getting rid of their older challengers
 

Shimmy1

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Aug 14, 2014
Messages
4,316
Location
North Dakota
Looking good how come you won’t run quad tracks with those pans. Also keep an eye out at auctions or ag listings here in California for farmers getting rid of their older challengers
Reliable Quads cost twice as much to buy, twice as much to maintain, and my guys hate running them.
 
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