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Stuck in mud best ways to get out

Delmer

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 3, 2013
Messages
8,910
Location
WI
Right, that is not stuck, that is just normal slipping in the mud with a 2wd backhoe. You have to try a lot harder than that to get really stuck. Looks like it's not steep, or flat either, there's a wet area in the background, but this immediate area is not particularly wet. There should be no question of it sinking further, or not reaching a bottom. It doesn't even look like the tires are deep enough to freeze into the ice from the first pics before the snow. The snow won't be a problem, and if the water freezes over the top it will hold the snow and allow the water to soak in possibly without any frost at all. Pick a nice day that you want to do some work and go up there, either now or in the spring, it won't hurt it one bit to sit as long as the battery is charged up when it was shut off. If they cranked it till dead, they should have removed the battery, or charged it or it will freeze.
 

aighead

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Joined
Apr 25, 2019
Messages
2,594
Location
Dayton, OH
This may be a dumb question but how much trouble would it be to just drag her out with the excavator? Even if in gear? It's stuck, right? The tires should slide until you are on firmer ground, even then I'd think the tires would just rut a bit but still slide until you are on something hard...

Skyking- that story sounds terrifying!
 

skyking1

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 3, 2020
Messages
7,821
Location
washington
not really a dumb question but a most definite "Not going to happen that way".
Dead machine weight is really difficult to overcome.
 

jimmynoshow

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Sep 8, 2023
Messages
61
Location
New Jersey
What is easy for you , obviously is not for me , just as i would say in my trade, loading 35 loaded shipping containers on to a ship on a windy day is also easy as some guys can load 10-12 per hr depending on wind condition and ship bay placement
 

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jimmynoshow

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Joined
Sep 8, 2023
Messages
61
Location
New Jersey
This may be a dumb question but how much trouble would it be to just drag her out with the excavator? Even if in gear? It's stuck, right? The tires should slide until you are on firmer ground, even then I'd think the tires would just rut a bit but still slide until you are on something hard...

Skyking- that story sounds terrifying!
I think he brought the tiny excavator , just got to get up there myself, if I was getting paid to get a machine out I think I would’ve called and said I can’t get it started before I left and said I couldn’t get it started . My bad for trusting that they would get it done waste of $400. I was on vacation this week instead of trusting somebody else and paying to get it out for no aggravation. I should’ve just went up there myself my bad this kind of bullshit won’t ever happen again.
 

jimmynoshow

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Joined
Sep 8, 2023
Messages
61
Location
New Jersey
Like I said, they said they couldn’t get it started by the way I’m going up there with Either, tools generator, bullet heater , fuel filters , fuel shut off solenoid, lift pump and diesel and batteries, I will get that machine running! and once I do, I’ll lift her up if nonetheless get wood underneath so she’s on flat ground if I get running real quick, I might try to play and see if I can get it out otherwise I’m just shooting for getting it out of any holes hoping to drive it out next trip when it’s frozen solid
 

jimmynoshow

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Joined
Sep 8, 2023
Messages
61
Location
New Jersey
Yeah , im not a bachoe operator, just bought this to do things to a property my friend and I split up In Pulaski New York, we been fishing up there for 20 years and wanted something on the water ant this property we ended up buying. Needs to be leveled and a few dump trucks of stone to be able to put a couple of campers up there so I figured if I just bought a backhoe would be cheaper than renting one . Also good for driveway snow to get to the property
 

skyking1

Senior Member
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Nov 3, 2020
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7,821
Location
washington
so you have no real schedule, right?
In that case try to refrain from operating in the mud :)
My dad said, you know what mud and S**T have in common?
The more you stir them, the worse they stink. :)
Don't get me wrong, I've worked in some real crap spots that you dared not get down off the equipment, but that was on somebody else's dime and their schedule. You get SOO much more done on a nice dry day in the dry season. No mess to clean up. No mud to try and make look good. The rocks goes so much farther on the dry ground too.
 

Coytee

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Joined
May 30, 2015
Messages
214
Location
Knoxville, TN
Once you get it back on firm ground and have some time to play with it, do take time to practice some of the moves as suggested. Not only are some of these techniques useful for getting a machine unstuck, but also for regular everyday digging tasks.

For example, you need to get proficient at pushing the machine along with the hoe, which is the only efficient way to move forward when trenching. Also needed when lifting/pushing yourself forward to jump over an open ditch or trench. Next is lifting the machine and pivoting it side to side with the hoe. This is used to quickly square up to parallel sides of a wider hole or trench (say 6-8’ wide) as you are digging it. Also useful for getting yourself on or off a trench you are straddling. Lastly using the hoe and loader together to lift and walk the machine, useful for getting up and out of deeper excavations with straight walls.

Some of these are pretty advanced techniques and situation you
may never need, but others you’ll encounter regularly. I see it all the time where new operators just view a backhoe as a tractor with a couple attachments on it. Don’t be the guy who digs a few feet of trench, spins the seat around, lifts up the outriggers and loader, and puts it in gear to move ahead a few feet lol.

Mr. Jimmynoshow, I'm also not an operator. I bought a JCB 1550B essentially cold turkey (from brother in law so was trusted source)

One thing I did in the very beginning was to go down by the lake. Put machine down to idle. Dipped the backhoe bucket into the lake to fill it. I tried to move that bucket as many directions as I could, without spilling any water.

I can't say factually how much that helped me learn but I don't think it slowed down any learning!

Also, what MG84 says above makes a lot of sense.

I looked for pictures (which I know I have) and can't find them yet. I live next to a managed lake. They lower the levels during winter and let it raise back up for spring/summer. (It's a TVA, Tennessee Valley Authnority lake)

I obtained permission to take my backhoe out to the now exposed 'beach' since the water was down. This would otherwise be maybe 4-5 feet deep when the water is up. I used the hoe to skim some muck and dumped it closer to shore. Later, I scooped the pile near the shore and dumped it into a smaller tractor that had a loader so someone could carry it to a ravine on the farm.

Win/win....until I sunk down to my axel's. I was utterly dead in the muck. I am however, persistent. I had thought of several things.... try to pull it out (brother in law has some heavy machinery) maybe tie off to a tree and see if I could roll bucket over & over & over to inch my way out....

I finally used hoe to push wheels out of the muck, had outriggers down to slow sinking back in. Used hoe to crab the back end around (I was facing INTO the deeper lake so going in reverse just slung mud) Used the hoe to move up, over, down..... up, over,down.... again & again until I could redirect towards the shore. I also had to raise the front bucket so things weren't binding up there. Once pointed in the right direction I then did what I call "pogo'ed" Put the front bucket up, I don't recall if the outriggers were up (probably) or maybe down partially to protect a bit towards rolling to side. Just like you might do a push up.... I used the hoe as an arm to push the machine up and forward and also had (if I recall) machine in gear so wheels were also trying to move (2-wd)

I had let worry get in my way and I just "knew" that it was stuck there forever and "soon" (like 5 months later) the water was going to rise and ruin everything..... that was very unfounded as there were other ways to also try to pull it out BUT, pushing with the hoe did it. Not being familiar with your machine, I'm going to presume the hoe can easily lift and shake the entire machine so it has the power, you just want to be pointed in the right direction.
 

Delmer

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 3, 2013
Messages
8,910
Location
WI
I don't remember if you said anything about your mechanical experience, but the first thing I'd say to get it started is to warm up the engine, bring a charged warm battery to swap in, and wait until the engine is warm before trying anything like filters. If you can get #1 diesel, bring that and add it to the tank, but if you can get the engine up to 50 with a heater, you shouldn't have any problem.
 

aighead

Senior Member
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Apr 25, 2019
Messages
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Dayton, OH
I'm with skyking on trying to not work in the mud, but I know sometimes that's almost impossible. The amount of dry days, that have been dry for enough days to not rut up my entire yard, are few. You have to take advantage of what you can, but the ruts are real.
 

skyking1

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Nov 3, 2020
Messages
7,821
Location
washington
I don't have many pictures of the real crap holes, you want to forget.
I'm at the top of that slope behind the dump truck in a narrow alley, about to dive down there with some bedding. It was just a slide on that steel sheet at the bottom, like freestyle skiing. The pumps were set on either side of that but the bathtub beyond was just a nightmare.
We squeegeed all that crap around and managed to drop enough semi-solids out of it to "backfill".
PXL-20210111-225852324-1.jpg


Catchbasins, oil water separator, Sanitary and storm piping in there.
This was my last trip out.
To quote Deadpool, Maximum Effort!
PXL-20210121-185801066.jpg
 

Welder Dave

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Oct 11, 2014
Messages
12,836
Location
Canada
Getting a rubber tire backhoe stuck is nothing like getting a track loader with a backhoe stuck. The absolute worst is when the slop packed in the tracks and around the sprockets freezes solid. It was all a D5N could do to get it out. I had to lift the machine with the hoe or it wouldn't have came out. What happened was I broke through a few inches of frozen ground into very sloppy loam. I had to get it out. If I waited till spring for everything to thaw out it would have just kept sinking where I'd need a really big machine to get it out.
 

aighead

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Joined
Apr 25, 2019
Messages
2,594
Location
Dayton, OH
That 4th picture from Skykings series shows, clearly, the ruts I was talking about.

That's looks like a miserable place to try to work.
 
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