• Thank you for visiting HeavyEquipmentForums.com! Our objective is to provide industry professionals a place to gather to exchange questions, answers and ideas. We welcome you to register using the "Register" icon at the top of the page. We'd appreciate any help you can offer in spreading the word of our new site. The more members that join, the bigger resource for all to enjoy. Thank you!

Equipment to erect 40x80x18 steel building

Georgia Iron

Senior Member
Joined
May 6, 2012
Messages
889
Location
USA - Georgia
Occupation
Concrete building slab and grading contractor
Too big, to long, it would be awkward as a cub bear for most telehandler work. Very few jobsites I've been on, have room for something like that to get around on.

I've also set up too many dumped over telehandlers, to trust the average telehandler operator with something this size.

The video is a hilarious promo piece " we don't even need cranes" and "nothing else is like this" . Well, its basically a crawler crane that can't swing.

The real push behind bigger telehandlers is simply to get away from the certification requirements of crane operators. Typically anyone and their dog is allowed on the jobsite telehandler. Making ever bigger telehandlers isn't the answer.
I was unfamiliar with what it can do.

DESCRIPTION

In a category all its own and affectionately nicknamed Trackzilla, the XR50100-G smashes the limits of material handling capabilities. With a record-breaking 100-ft maximum lift height and forward reach of 75 ft, this telehandler is a game-changer in the world of heavy lifting. Xtreme’s first tracked machine tackles rough terrain with ease and can lift up to 50,000 lbs. Engineered for operator safety and comfort, the XR50100-G, is built with all the features that make our machines so popular with users.
  • 360° operator visibility
  • Suspension seat
  • Easy service access
  • Protected tilt & extend cylinders
  • Steel hydraulic & fuel tanks
  • Long-life Lexan labels
  • Large-capacity fuel tank
  • Trunnion-mounted sway cylinders
  • Melonite pins
  • Dual auxiliary hydraulic circuits
  • Steel dash
  • Triple batteries
  • Hydraulic cab lift/lower & rotate
  • Rear back-up camera
  • Ductile steel manifold
  • Easy cab-mounted grab handles
  • Master disconnect switch
  • Boom lift point
  • Manual lowering valve (cylinders)
  • Large cross-section boom
  • Easy tiedowns
  • Heavy-duty pre-cleaner
  • Additional high-pressure hydraulic filter
  • Multi-function display screen
  • Long-life boom rollers
  • Solid steel plate chassis
  • Rear axle stabilization (RAS)
  • Back-up alarm with light
It weights 150,000 lbs. I was curious as to how easily it could be moved compared to a 300 ton crane. I was told it takes 18 truck loads to bring the 300 ton cranes in for these tilt wall buildings at a cost of 36k to move it in and out.

I have had to clip a grade closer to level with my motor grader for the big 300s on a few jobs. Watching them try to track around unlevel areas and seeing the jib move about is a little unnerving.

Definitely needs some space to move it around.
 
Last edited:

Welder Dave

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 11, 2014
Messages
12,712
Location
Canada
Reading all the features they list, most of it seems like fluff that has nothing to do with how usefull or maneuverable the machine is. I'm going to buy it because it has a steel dash and a heavy duty pre-cleaner. 360 degree operator visibility but the boom doesn't swivel. Obviously they can't mention how much real estate it takes or the turning radius.
 

CM1995

Administrator
Joined
Jan 21, 2007
Messages
13,473
Location
Alabama
Occupation
Running what I brung and taking what I win
THIS is what you really need!

That's gotta be a gov't spec'd and paid for machine. No sane business man would create that expecting to sell it on the open market.

Reminds me of the movie Pentagon Wars.
 

crane operator

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 27, 2009
Messages
8,382
Location
sw missouri
It weights 150,000 lbs. I was curious as to how easily it could be moved compared to a 300 ton crane. I was told it takes 18 truck loads to bring the 300 ton cranes in for these tilt wall buildings at a cost of 36k to move it in and out.
A 150,000lbs machine is nothing like a 300 ton crane. 150,000lbs compares to more like a 100 ton crane.

It only lifts 50k, which is right in line with a 100ton crane. Tilt up jobs are 200-300,000lbs plus panels. Which is 300 ton crane territory.

Its a specialized machine for a special use. Its not going to revolutionize the construction industry.
 

crane operator

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 27, 2009
Messages
8,382
Location
sw missouri
So after thinking about it a while and talking to a few friends, I decided I will rent my neighbor's 8k telehandler off of him. He gets a little extra cash, as its not used frequently, and I can pretty much use it all I want. So the time crunch rental clock thing isn't an issue.

As much as I love equipment I'd love to buy the crane and play operator but I will use my budgeted "crane money" to pay for my fire sprinkler system. That RT would be perfect for this project, however I would have a real hard time selling it once I am done with it. It would just sit in the yard for the most part once I was finished.

I own a slab scissor lift, and I am considering buying an RT scissor to help with installation of my wall sheets. 2 of the sides of the building are 10' off of my fenced property line, so an RT scissor without outriggers would barely squeeze between the building and fence. That wouldn't leave much room for a man on the ground to work where the scissor was, so I am also considering a boom lift. This is my own project so I really don't have to worry about meeting a strict schedule.

Thanks again for all the advice.
I think you'll be much happier and more productive with that list. I hope the building goes well, and don't be afraid to ask advice, there's lots of guys who have done this before.

The first one I built, I got handed a set of plans and just figured it out. I probably spent a lot more time squaring and measuring out the building and walls, than the guys that do it every day. Its not cabinet work.

Good luck!
 

Keith Merrell

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 29, 2020
Messages
237
Location
Cottonwood, AZ
I think you'll be much happier and more productive with that list. I hope the building goes well, and don't be afraid to ask advice, there's lots of guys who have done this before.

The first one I built, I got handed a set of plans and just figured it out. I probably spent a lot more time squaring and measuring out the building and walls, than the guys that do it every day. Its not cabinet work.

Good luck!

Thanks. Perhaps I will create a thread on the build.
 

Manistar

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 29, 2023
Messages
49
Location
Minnesota
Owning both cranes and a just a 6000lb 34ft telehandler, if I were going to build a building this size and could only have one on-site it would definitely be the telehandler. They're just more versatile on a jobsite for material handling. After two weeks I wouldn't give the concrete a second thought but even after a week I wouldn't be too concerned driving a telehandler on it. Setting rafters you're probably not going to be doing it fast enough to really notice a difference with either machine.
 
Top