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Need Some Help...

HandLogger

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 21, 2007
Messages
108
Location
Berkshires
Occupation
Forest Land Management
How about a tee with one of these: https://s3.amazonaws.com/onehydraulicsdata/DATASHEETS/SBLV.pdf

SBLV_ab723dad-5af9-48b2-922c-bad1324714cf_297x.jpg
In practice, that seems like the same idea as the 3-way valve first suggested in this thread by Tinkerer. I'll look into the various parts one would need for this and do the math. If it proves to be cheaper, I don't see why not. Thanks for the suggestion. :)

By the way, I've been employing the pressure relief suggestion that was mentioned a few times in this thread and, thus far, it seems to be working out. In short, I've been shutting the machine down, waiting about 5 minutes, pressing on the male and the female Faster FFH08 couplings on the [unused] high pressure side of our machine and -- after they can be easily pushed inward -- I remove the FFH10 snowblower couplings from the high flow side of the machine. Needless to say, this doesn't take care of residual pressure buildup that can occur with temperature fluctuations, so I'm definitely still looking for a permanent solution.
 

HandLogger

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 21, 2007
Messages
108
Location
Berkshires
Occupation
Forest Land Management
Is it the attachment or machine that's causing the problem?
The original problem was an inability to connect to the high flow "block" on the left side of the machine, which is clearly shown in Post 26 of this thread. Long story a bit shorter, the FFH10 couplings on the snowblower [attachment] side of the circuit were eventually loosened to relieve residual pressure buildup and, as also shown in Post 26, the snowblower was finally connected to the machine.

The subsequent discussion has revolved around options to permanently fix and/or relieve residual pressure on the attachment side of the circuit. Needless to say, the Stucchi USA casting shown in Post 36 of this thread is a great [and quick] way to relieve pressure in a closed circuit, but it's also a very expensive way to go about this...and, besides, it still doesn't help with residual pressure that builds up in the attachment side during temperature changes. Anyway, that's what we've been discussing here. :)
 

KSSS

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 27, 2005
Messages
4,248
Location
Idaho
Occupation
excavation
Good to hear the pressure clearing procedure on the machine is working as designed. I doubt being it is a snow blower you will see any significant pressure increases due to temp changes. Cold temps are not going to increase the pressure on the unconnected hoses. You could store the hyd lines out of the sun (down the down spout on the blower would work perhaps) just to be sure, but I doubt you would see temps rise enough that it would heat up to the point it would create a problem.
 

gwhammy

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 20, 2013
Messages
597
Location
missouri
I have this happen on my jackhammer when it's unhooked some. I crack a line on it. It seems if you can release all the pressure with the couplers before unhooking it isn't as bad. Same with my thumb on the excavator when I switch back to it. Any weight on the thumb cylinder and they won't couple. These are the small couplers so not as bad. Someone pushing or pulling on the blades on the snowblower while coupling may relieve each hose enough to help couple. I apologize if any of this is a repeat of something I put on earlier, I didn't look.
 
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