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The Ultimate Small Dozer

John White

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 23, 2007
Messages
214
Location
Newark, Ohio
About 15 years ago (Now 83) I had two properties that needed dozer work. I had two different dozer people out to do some dozer work for me. Waste of money. Could do about as much with my tractor and a box blade with a riper. I decided I wanted to play in the dirt and play with the Tonka toys. I had a F350 truck and 12 gvw tailer and I didn't want to change equiement to haul one and thought the mini was the way to go. First one was a Massy Furgerson 200. Had a nice cab and had sat in a field for about 7 years so the mice had pretty well taken it over it. It wouldn't run. Had a fellow push it up on my trailer with a Case BH. Got it all cleaned up, painted, rewired, used it quite a bit. next thing I knew I was getting callls to come out and do small ddozer jobs (fence rows, trailer pads, repairing roads, etc.) Used it for a year or two, and it was needing major work soon. No parts available, Little cab was nice in cold weather, had a heater) Some fellow came along that had money that was burning a hole in his pocket, out of my life and into his. By this time I was about ready to semi retire and close my auto repair business for 30 years. Still wanted to stay small. Bought a Case 350. Not as efficent as the MF 200. Painted it up good, repaired cyl. leaks and sold it. Ran on to a old Allice HD4, low hours, Excellent shape,Used it for a few years, hard to get parts for it too. That was during the housing boom in 2000 or so. Did alot of back fill and conturing yards. Found it was more efficient to do just the rough stuff with the dozer and the finish work with my little NH 1900 with box blade and York rake. Some where in there some septic pumping and installing co. wanted me to do work for them as it was cheaper for me to do it than pay his own men plus he could move them on to another job and I would close up and alot of times picked up extra work because it was a new house and needed gutter drains, yard clened up and smoothed. I had also bought a small JD skid steer and JD 50 track hoe. Co. I was doing dozer for septic, sold business, and housing went bust. I sold the HD4 and that was when they were inporting all those little Komatsu and Mitsubushi dozers. I foun a little BD2H with a 8 way blade ( yes 8 way) did alot of work with it. Finally my wrists and fingers got to bothering me alot from pulling on the levers, and getting older. Fellow who I was doing septic work said build up a septic pumper. Not near as hard on the old body and more money. Still have the little Mitsu and my son had learned to use it on his farm. Any of you ever run the little Konatsu? I hear some of them have a joy stick. Wonder how that would be on the hands and wrists. Sold my septic co after 15 years two years ago. Was getting too hard for me to do it all by myself at 81. Went to a homeless shelter for men and offered to pay some $40 a hour to help me. IL could still drive and maintain the truck but was just too hard dragging the hoses. Couldn't find any one to work. So that's why I sold it. The little dozers have their place. Alot of the small jobs the felllows with the big machiners are not interested. Hope I didn't bore you with my experence with small dozers.
 

Welder Dave

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 11, 2014
Messages
12,712
Location
Canada
A joystick would probably be easier on hands and wrists. I think some of the fancy newer machines you can adjust the sensitivity and resistance of the joysticks. I've heard the MF dozers were good machines in their day. The MF200 would have sipped fuel with the 3 cylinder Perkins. It must have had a lot of hours on it because those engines are as bullet proof as they come. The engine parts are readily available.
 

cuttin edge

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 9, 2014
Messages
2,760
Location
NB Canada
Occupation
Finish grader operator
First of all I am not a dozer expert by any means but have owned a few. Our new D3 (formerly the D5K) is one fine small dozer. Cat refined their small dozer line as they were falling behind with the G and K series IMO which resulted in a very well balanced finish tractor.

Ours is LGP so that has something to do with balance. Speed is infinitively proportioned along with power to the ground. Only have 300 hours on it and of course it has a lot of electronics so time will be the true judge.

View attachment 249885
When you are in the seat, can you see the cutting edge bolts on the back of the blade?
 

Willie B

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 2, 2016
Messages
4,075
Location
Mount Tabor VT
Occupation
Electrician
My Dresser TD7G has a kind of narrow blade. If I angle it at all I can't see the corners of the blade from the seat. I have contemplated adding little flexible wings to indicate blade height.

My friend grew up with two TD7E. He can lay a lawn or even a flat pad preparing for concrete slab flawlessly by eye. He recommends angle the blade, do a series of short pushes to finish grade. Don't push far enough to let the tracks fall into a dip where you cut too low.
 

cuttin edge

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 9, 2014
Messages
2,760
Location
NB Canada
Occupation
Finish grader operator
No but I can see the outside edge of the end bits.
I notice talking to a lot of the guys at work, that none of them like our D4K. They like the cab, and what not, but they all find it a bugger to operate. Everyone, including myself prefer the old D3G, or 450 Deere. Last time I ran it, I noticed I could see the bolts, and for some reason, it made me in my mind, want to roll the blade forward, like the grader to start the cut. Anyway, it made me wonder if perhaps the blade as set too far ahead. Nowhere near the machine now, but is that top link not adjustable, and if so, is there a factory spec for what the pitch of the blade should be.
 

CM1995

Administrator
Joined
Jan 21, 2007
Messages
13,473
Location
Alabama
Occupation
Running what I brung and taking what I win
I notice talking to a lot of the guys at work, that none of them like our D4K. They like the cab, and what not, but they all find it a bugger to operate. Everyone, including myself prefer the old D3G, or 450 Deere. Last time I ran it, I noticed I could see the bolts, and for some reason, it made me in my mind, want to roll the blade forward, like the grader to start the cut. Anyway, it made me wonder if perhaps the blade as set too far ahead. Nowhere near the machine now, but is that top link not adjustable, and if so, is there a factory spec for what the pitch of the blade should be.

Our D3 is a Next Gen not a K series. We rented a few K series and decided to pass until the Next Gen came out which is a different tractor than the K's IMO.

Our D3 is LGP and fun to operate.
 

Oxbow

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 22, 2012
Messages
1,220
Location
Idaho
I notice talking to a lot of the guys at work, that none of them like our D4K. They like the cab, and what not, but they all find it a bugger to operate. Everyone, including myself prefer the old D3G, or 450 Deere. Last time I ran it, I noticed I could see the bolts, and for some reason, it made me in my mind, want to roll the blade forward, like the grader to start the cut. Anyway, it made me wonder if perhaps the blade as set too far ahead. Nowhere near the machine now, but is that top link not adjustable, and if so, is there a factory spec for what the pitch of the blade should be.
It sounds like yours is pitched forward too much to me. I'm not familiar with the Ks, but every dozer I have run has been adjustable. Usually on c frames it will be on the left blade support which usually has three holes from which to choose. On a D6N it was in the top link center of the blade.
 

Oxbow

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 22, 2012
Messages
1,220
Location
Idaho
I just looked at the D4K brochure; the top bar center of the dozer is adjustable. Adjusting the pitch back should improve grade ability and be more forgiving.
 

cuttin edge

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 9, 2014
Messages
2,760
Location
NB Canada
Occupation
Finish grader operator
I just looked at the D4K brochure; the top bar center of the dozer is adjustable. Adjusting the pitch back should improve grade ability and be more forgiving.
I looked at it today,, and it was parked beside our 450 Deere, and it is way too far ahead. I think some adjustment is in order.
 

orangeman

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 17, 2011
Messages
63
Location
new york
Always was fond of the Allis Chalmers H4-HD4 then 652 and 653 dozers. Would have liked to see those AC designs with updates to 2024 with a wet back end, cabs with AC and Heat and production of parts and tooling here in the U.S. OEM tracks for the units mentioned was done in Springfield Illinois so the talent is here to build the U/C.
 

JD955SC

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 13, 2011
Messages
1,362
Location
The South
I notice talking to a lot of the guys at work, that none of them like our D4K. They like the cab, and what not, but they all find it a bugger to operate. Everyone, including myself prefer the old D3G, or 450 Deere. Last time I ran it, I noticed I could see the bolts, and for some reason, it made me in my mind, want to roll the blade forward, like the grader to start the cut. Anyway, it made me wonder if perhaps the blade as set too far ahead. Nowhere near the machine now, but is that top link not adjustable, and if so, is there a factory spec for what the pitch of the blade should be.

We try to ship them neutral (even threads on both ends of the link) and let the operators adjust to preference.
 
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