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Galion 150 Refurbish

BobCatBob

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 4, 2010
Messages
298
Location
Chicago
By the way Bob- nice pictures and a nice lift with your crane- you're like tradesman though- you've got this strange white stuff flying around, and all over the ground in those pictures- which is almost as disturbing as them being upside down.


Thanks Crane Operator. I had set up my construction light (in case the trucker was late), built a transition platfrom to lower the CNC onto (used machine skates from there), set the crane true and level, warmed up the machine prior to lift......all was planned.....except for snow.

Hey, I've followed your posts for years....is that a 70's Grove you own? I remember the orange and brown stripes (one steering axle vs. two) on my grandfathers crane.....awesome machine.
 

old-iron-habit

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 22, 2012
Messages
4,233
Location
Moose Lake, MN
Occupation
Retired Cons't. Supt./Hospitals
Thanks Old Iron. I'm still waiting for your rebuild thread....now that your knees "new and improved". Where are you with the project?

It's been a long time since I was around working cranes, but my grandfather had a man basket he made and used (he was an Iron worker before owning a crane.....his man basket attached to his boom like a jib.....it was really cool, welded square tube steel, very stout.

I still have my knees, although some days I think I need replacements. I think you got two of us mixed up. I have a 318 Cat equipped Koering 405 with dragline, clam shell, and 8 part block in my sights but have not been able to close the deal yet.
 

td25c

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 14, 2009
Messages
5,250
Location
indiana
I bought this CNC for my use (another "tool" for my refurbishing projects).....and learned how to program and set up a CNC mill many years ago (was my 1st career).....now a "can't buy the part, I'll make it" component in my arsenal of bringing life back into forgotten and unloved equipment. The lift I did was simple for you guys, but I planned out as if I was lifting a man basket safety wise (measured everything, reviewed load charts, doubled up on slings, watched bubble level in cab the further I boomed out, etc). I was nervous, but incredibly excited to do it for the 1st time.....and it worked as planned.

Good move on the CNC mill !

Amazing what they can do with a good operator . I'm somewhat of a troglodyte so CNC machines are pretty intimidating .

Have a few machine tools in the shop but they are all hand crank & lever as that's all I'm comfortable with .

Hard telling what the CNC mill would turn out if I started grunting at it while punching on the buttons .LOL!:D

Like you say no issues on discontinued parts as you just program in the dimensions & it cranks it out .

Luckily have a good buddy that has a shop full of these machines and knows what to do with them . Amazing tools & talent !

Always up to the challenge . He cranked me out a pretty nice gland nut for and old Ford backhoe on a CNC .

http://www.heavytruckforums.com/showthread.php?263-Some-Holmes-750-action&p=1902&viewfull=1#post1902

It's almost like we are seeing another industrial revolution with the CNC machines falling in to the hands of small shops that take care of customers . I like it ! :thumbsup
 

BobCatBob

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 4, 2010
Messages
298
Location
Chicago
Good move on the CNC mill !

Amazing what they can do with a good operator . I'm somewhat of a troglodyte so CNC machines are pretty intimidating .

Have a few machine tools in the shop but they are all hand crank & lever as that's all I'm comfortable with .

Hard telling what the CNC mill would turn out if I started grunting at it while punching on the buttons .LOL!:D

Like you say no issues on discontinued parts as you just program in the dimensions & it cranks it out .

Luckily have a good buddy that has a shop full of these machines and knows what to do with them . Amazing tools & talent !

Always up to the challenge . He cranked me out a pretty nice gland nut for and old Ford backhoe on a CNC .

http://www.heavytruckforums.com/showthread.php?263-Some-Holmes-750-action&p=1902&viewfull=1#post1902

It's almost like we are seeing another industrial revolution with the CNC machines falling in to the hands of small shops that take care of customers . I like it ! :thumbsup

Thanks Td25c.......yes, a Bridgeport, le blond lathe....bluing ink and a scribe......you can pretty much make anything. A CNC just makes it look good....and a little faster.

I concur.....there are a lot of people like me who got out of the industry when the "race to lowest cost provider" ....China.....took a hold of manufacturing in the early 90's.....and switched careers. Now, we're on the other side and looking back on the joy of making your own parts.....exciting things to come out of this.
 

colson04

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 11, 2016
Messages
2,098
Location
Delton, Michigan
Too cool man, excellent rebuild and very well documented thread. Thank you for taking the time to document and share for others to see.

While I haven't moved past the 'keep things functional' stage of owning equipment, I do plan on overhauling and restoring my 743 Bobcat and my Deere 310A TLB. Both are to be lengthy projects as both are functional machines being used quite frequently, but have been cobbled on and neglected over the years before I purchased them. You certainly set the bar high for those of us looking to take on that kind of project. Keep up the excellent work and I look forward to reading about your snowcat rebuild.

Sent from my SCH-I545 using Tapatalk
 

BobCatBob

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 4, 2010
Messages
298
Location
Chicago
Too cool man, excellent rebuild and very well documented thread. Thank you for taking the time to document and share for others to see.

While I haven't moved past the 'keep things functional' stage of owning equipment, I do plan on overhauling and restoring my 743 Bobcat and my Deere 310A TLB. Both are to be lengthy projects as both are functional machines being used quite frequently, but have been cobbled on and neglected over the years before I purchased them. You certainly set the bar high for those of us looking to take on that kind of project. Keep up the excellent work and I look forward to reading about your snowcat rebuild.

Sent from my SCH-I545 using Tapatalk

Thanks Colson

One of my first posts on Heavy Equipment forums was of a cosmetic/light rebuild update on our Bobcat 753c. What I never posted was what really made a difference: replacing all the pins and bearings on all moveable parts (except the engine, the Kubota 2203's are tanks....we have 4,000 hours on ours.....and these engines can run for 10,000-15,000hrs Before rebuild). It tightened the machine up, runs like brand new (5 years now). I have replaced one hydraulic drive motor, resealed two cylinders....pretty simple work. Luckily we have no issues with hydraulics (that can get tricky). The older machines like yours and mine have very few electronics.....a blessing considering the bulk of problems people have with the new machines are "error" codes that stop the machines.

Remember, have fun.....it's the journey, not the destination when rebuilding.
 

td25c

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 14, 2009
Messages
5,250
Location
indiana
Thanks Td25c.......yes, a Bridgeport, le blond lathe....bluing ink and a scribe......you can pretty much make anything. A CNC just makes it look good....and a little faster.

I concur.....there are a lot of people like me who got out of the industry when the "race to lowest cost provider" ....China.....took a hold of manufacturing in the early 90's.....and switched careers. Now, we're on the other side and looking back on the joy of making your own parts.....exciting things to come out of this.

No doubt Bob ! :)

Have several construction machines & trucks that have not had dealer parts support for years . I can still get parts , just have to walk in the local machine shop & bend the ear of the owner and they crank out a new one for us .:thumbsup

These small machine shops of today have the same capability of a large manufacturer in the 1950's with the ability build what needs built in a quick time frame .

We are in interesting times for sure and I like it .:D
 

BobCatBob

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 4, 2010
Messages
298
Location
Chicago
Full power boom in old school talk .;):)

When I read the Galion crane manuals the 1st time, I was surprised to see a section for "pinning the boom"....pulling out the last section manually, then pinning it in place. I'm surprised they actually sold cranes like that......likely to increase the lifting capacity.
 

td25c

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 14, 2009
Messages
5,250
Location
indiana
That's cool your Galion has " full power " on the boom .

My Grove TM's all have " dead section " where you pull the pin and throw latches to run it out when you need it .
Push it out with the cylinder then run it back & install the pin .Takes a little time but not to big of a deal .
 

BobCatBob

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 4, 2010
Messages
298
Location
Chicago
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Gents! Noticed oil spitting out around the engine head.....pulled the head.....I had rolled the perimeter head gasket when rebuilding the engine. The block had been decked....so the gasket grove had less depth to hold the gasket in (gasket is like a big rubber band, stretched when installed).....this time I used a little super glue to keep it in place. Also replaced the radiator hoses (we’ll see if the mice eat these ones, silicone this time).

Having fun! Happy Thanksgiving.

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terex herder

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 10, 2017
Messages
1,833
Location
Kansas
If you keep the engine clean like that people will wonder where the green leaker moniker came from. My experience with silicone hoses is the silicone doesn't tolerate chafing nearly as well as rubber.
 

BobCatBob

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 4, 2010
Messages
298
Location
Chicago
I’ll give the silicone hoses a try (should be no chafing against them, open for the most) and report back next year after “mouse season” is over.

As for the CNC Mill.....I’ve used it mainly for aesthetic projects (emblems and badges out of 6061).....but did some tooling work with it and a part for a friend (stem nut for an early Harley Hummer....real odd ball size thread).

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Having fun!
 

John Griffin

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 8, 2018
Messages
264
Location
Huntsville, AL
I really enjoyed reading through your posts on restoring the gailon. Your posts are inspiring for me. I just bought an old austin western rough terrain crane. I didn't expect it to end with a cnc mill. I have a few of them myself and really enjoy making unavailable parts for projects.
 

BobCatBob

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 4, 2010
Messages
298
Location
Chicago
Thanks John. It’s really a passion for me (rebuilding old school machinery close to OEM spec). It’s not for a profit to sell or even to put back into production, it’s more for the challenge. Once you commit to a restoration...there is always a moment of “what have I gotten myself into”.

CNC is an ultimate tool in this process!

I finished this project last year: Bombardier SW48 Snowcat

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Having fun!

P.s. Some of the smartest people I ever met were Crane Operators (my grandfather) and Tool & Die makers.
 
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