• Thank you for visiting HeavyEquipmentForums.com! Our objective is to provide industry professionals a place to gather to exchange questions, answers and ideas. We welcome you to register using the "Register" icon at the top of the page. We'd appreciate any help you can offer in spreading the word of our new site. The more members that join, the bigger resource for all to enjoy. Thank you!

Just some work pics

Natman

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 19, 2016
Messages
995
Location
ID
I'm starting a riding arena next week, big girder trusses every 10 or 12', but like the one I did before for the same crew, I'll have to sit there for a good hour after setting one, while they put all the purlins in. I'd suggest just putting every other one in to still brace it adequately but get me outa there sooner, but at times like that I have to remind myself that I'm not the carpenter running the job, and to just keep my mouth shut and do what they tell me. Counting the money made helps make up for the old carpenter frustration. Like when I see some crews putting every single Teco nail in a joist hanger, while I watch, while the other truss end is nailed solid to the plate, I guess they think the truss may jump up in the air or something, if so, one nail would be good, put the rest in when I'm done, would save them money. Any reasoning given for that 16" layout?
 

crane operator

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 27, 2009
Messages
8,382
Location
sw missouri
Any reasoning given for that 16" layout?
I asked- my customer said that's what the truss company recommended for their building. Its a church building with a stage in one end, a big open area, and then some bathrooms and maybe a small kitchen in the other end. Its only a 50' span, and I would think 24" centers would have worked, but maybe there's some kind of sound deading going in the ceiling that would be heavy? Who knows.

All I know is that it was two big piles of trusses.
 

skyking1

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 3, 2020
Messages
7,775
Location
washington
People fail all the time. They fail to come back and add the fasteners, or just miss a few.
It's less likely to be a pile of kindling in the morning after a sharp wind, doing it their way.
 

CM1995

Administrator
Joined
Jan 21, 2007
Messages
13,475
Location
Alabama
Occupation
Running what I brung and taking what I win
16" spacing might have something to do with fireproofing like 5/8" fire rock on the ceiling or something similar.
 

Natman

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 19, 2016
Messages
995
Location
ID
It'd be 5/8" rock for sure, as in any public use building. But that alone wouldn't account for 16" OC Maybe it penciled out better making more light duty trusses than fewer more robust ones? The most overbuilt buildings here are the Mormon church houses and temples, I've seen 16" OC there. In 24 years of setting trusses in Idaho snow country, I've only seen it a very few times. But yeah it's weird how they seem to take FOREVER to set.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

CM1995

Administrator
Joined
Jan 21, 2007
Messages
13,475
Location
Alabama
Occupation
Running what I brung and taking what I win
I've seen 2 layers of 5/8" fire rock spec'd or something similar to shaft wall on a ceiling as well. That would require 16" OC.
 

Tugger2

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 22, 2018
Messages
1,408
Location
British Columbia
I have a set of clutches like yours for pre cast. Amazing things ,some of those slabs get pretty heavy. How do you like those slings on the septic tanks? they look marginal,but everyone here uses the same ones here to.
 

crane operator

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 27, 2009
Messages
8,382
Location
sw missouri
We've used the clutches quite often, but the precast company is getting stingy about sending them out. So I just broke down and got my own.

I wouldn't mind some sets of the ball style that lock the bolt head imbeds, but there's a couple different sizes of them, and I know I would never have the right size.

The low angle cables aren't great with the precast boxes, but like you said, its what they all use. I always make sure to have a big round up or shackle along, because the crane hook won't ever fit their spreader bars.
 

Tugger2

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 22, 2018
Messages
1,408
Location
British Columbia
I do wonder who designs those tank spreaders ,most around here are strong backed with some rebar.
Those clutches are the most common here for bridge panels. Sometimes we use more with equalizing slings to get the capacity. Rigging right is always interesting.
 

Tugger2

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 22, 2018
Messages
1,408
Location
British Columbia
I do wonder who designs those tank spreaders ,most around here are strong backed with some rebar.
Those clutches are the most common here for bridge panels. Sometimes we use more with equalizing slings to get the capacity. Rigging right is always interesting.
 

dirty4fun

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 29, 2010
Messages
1,188
Location
N. IL
It'd be 5/8" rock for sure, as in any public use building. But that alone wouldn't account for 16" OC Maybe it penciled out better making more light duty trusses than fewer more robust ones? The most overbuilt buildings here are the Mormon church houses and temples, I've seen 16" OC there. In 24 years of setting trusses in Idaho snow country, I've only seen it a very few times. But yeah it's weird how they seem to take FOREVER to set.
As an old carpenter once told me if it is to strong you will never know it. Now I am older than he was when he told me that, amazing how that happens and so fast.
 

crane operator

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 27, 2009
Messages
8,382
Location
sw missouri
Talked to a guy yesterday about his old lull forklift. I need to help him for a little while monday, because the forklift is broken.

I know the lift, and knew it was a little detroit, customer thinks the fuel pump is down, of course its in the way. I think its a 3-53 or similar. They called all over looking for the pump, I've got a 6v92 hangar queen in the back room, so I'm dropping it's pump off this weekend. I think its the same pump.

Every time I've thought I had a fuel pump problem on a detroit, its actually something else. There's not much in those little gear pumps to go wrong.

I'll head back there later on Monday, and help them for the rest of the day, they've got a time crunch to get finished with what they needed the forklift for.
 

Oxbow

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 22, 2012
Messages
1,220
Location
Idaho
Talked to a guy yesterday about his old lull forklift. I need to help him for a little while monday, because the forklift is broken.

I know the lift, and knew it was a little detroit, customer thinks the fuel pump is down, of course its in the way. I think its a 3-53 or similar. They called all over looking for the pump, I've got a 6v92 hangar queen in the back room, so I'm dropping it's pump off this weekend. I think its the same pump.

Every time I've thought I had a fuel pump problem on a detroit, its actually something else. There's not much in those little gear pumps to go wrong.

I'll head back there later on Monday, and help them for the rest of the day, they've got a time crunch to get finished with what they needed the forklift for.
As you know, priming a two stroke is a chore, even when everything is working correctly. About have to find a way to force feed them until they take. I wonder if it could be as simple as that.
 

Oxbow

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 22, 2012
Messages
1,220
Location
Idaho
I thought if you fill the filters Detroits take off pretty easy?
We temporarily plumbed in a primer pump off a thermoking refer into a 318 to get it to go. Running one out of fuel was a horrible mistake. Just changing filters wasn't so bad. That was my experience anyway.
 

Welder Dave

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 11, 2014
Messages
12,712
Location
Canada
I watched a guy get a 6V-53 running in freezing temps (that had been sitting for a few month's) by taking the filter off and filling it completely full of diesel. He said Detroits were one of the easiest diesels to get going in the cold. As long as they had diesel you could get them started. It's OK to use a shot of ether too if you're getting some smoke out the exhaust.
 

crane operator

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 27, 2009
Messages
8,382
Location
sw missouri
He said Detroits were one of the easiest diesels to get going in the cold. As long as they had diesel you could get them started.
I don't know that I've found detroits any easier to start when its cold. Especially if they are a little worn out, most like a little sniff of starter fluid. And good batteries so they can spin fast enough.

Detroits do run so much fuel through the heads and back to tank, that they are nice to keep running, once you get them running in the cold.

No worries about gelling up on the road or at the jobsite, because the fuel tank will be warm to the touch. Its actually a nice place to warm you hands if you are cold, Just kind of give that big fuel tank a hug.
 
Top