• Thank you for visiting HeavyEquipmentForums.com! Our objective is to provide industry professionals a place to gather to exchange questions, answers and ideas. We welcome you to register using the "Register" icon at the top of the page. We'd appreciate any help you can offer in spreading the word of our new site. The more members that join, the bigger resource for all to enjoy. Thank you!

looking at cranes for some cabin and shop projects

crane operator

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 27, 2009
Messages
8,382
Location
sw missouri
The visibility on those low boom Cats is great.

I'm on the other side of that one- I would say the low boom is the worst thing about those cats. I much prefer a high rear boom like a skytrak/ genie/ jlg. (or one of the cats made by jlg with the high boom)

With the low boom, as soon as you get the load 1' off the ground, you have no visibility to the right side of the machine, none. All you can see is that boom. And every bundle of plywood and boards, I like to carry about 2' off the ground. You really don't get visibility to the right back, until the forks are 6-7' off the ground. Its like driving around a rt with the boom horizontal, you can't see anything to the right.

We had two cats when I worked at that powerhouse, and I was never so worried about running someone over as when I drove those. There were so many guys walking around all the time at that site, and visibility is so bad with a load on the forks. I actually preferred running our end loader with a set of forks over the cat telehandlers, at least you could see.

A high rear boom machine, you just look under the boom.
 
Last edited:

colson04

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 11, 2016
Messages
2,098
Location
Delton, Michigan
@crane operator is on point about the telehandler. I started using them on build sites 6 years ago, and was amazed at how late to the game I was in doing so. For most house work stuff, a 6000 pound, 42 ft boom handles everything. The last one I rented was $1500 for a week and we ran it daily. We set all of the trusses with it, moved all the roof sheeting, moved a lot of the wall and roof steel, etc. Also, used it to drag my stuck JLG out of the mud. Also, with 4x4x4, you really can get them into very tight spaces to place material. The bigger machines might not handle a tight space as easily, but the reach gets you there when the machine can't get closer.
 

Knepptune

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 22, 2012
Messages
758
Location
Indiana
I hate the low boom telehandlers almost as much as crane op hates horses. If I was only allowed two slaps for the rest of my life I’d happily slap that engineer twice. Just seeing one of those gets my blood pressure up. Man, I hate those things. Can’t see anything out of them if your load is an inch off the ground. Got to climb a ladder to get into the cab. I can’t believe that idea ever made it to market.

I don’t have a lot to add. Jlg would be my choice on a telehandler. Maybe because I’m most familiar with them but they have the best visibility and aftermarket support in my opinion.

Thanks for mentioning a low boom telehandler. Put me in a bad mood for the rest of the day.
 

colson04

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 11, 2016
Messages
2,098
Location
Delton, Michigan
If I was only allowed two slaps for the rest of my life I’d happily slap that engineer twice

Hahahahaha! Best line of my day! I have definitely felt that way before about stupid designs. Another good choice would be the engineers responsible for inaccessible engine oil filters, cartridge oil filters on the top of an engine, or John Deere's old school upside down oil filters on side of block. I mean, these things need regular service, why put them where they will make the biggest mess possible everytime to change it.
 

NwbHoss

Member
Joined
Feb 12, 2022
Messages
21
Location
Rice Washington
Occupation
retired crane operator
LOL my life revolves around horses. I couldn't imagine life without them.
Well a recon this is why I came here to get an education on the subject. the biggest reason for wanting a crane is I am a crane operator and its what I know. I suppose what I should do is some research on log home construction and get some better ideas on what equipment is best suited for the task at hand. Thank you for the slap upside the head. I have had a very narrow focus I might need to broaden my horizon a little.
Everything I have seen so far has always been a crane stacking logs and trusses
 

crane operator

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 27, 2009
Messages
8,382
Location
sw missouri
Everything I have seen so far has always been a crane stacking logs and trusses

We have done several log cabins in a resort near here. We set logs on 4 of them a few years back, and we did two this winter. And they built the other 20 or so cabins with only a telehandler to stack the logs.

The only cabins they have me lift logs for, are when there are trees surrounding the cabin, and they can't get close enough with the forklifts to set the logs. Two of them were on a slope/ cliff bluff, and too close to one another, that they couldn't get the telehandler where they needed to, and so had me set logs. But the telehandlers are on site from day one until they are finished. And they have me set logs for a day or two.

On the terex telehandler-

We've got a local contractor with two old terex/ square shooters. They are a simple tough old machine, I can't believe the abuse his machines have taken.

Like everything else terex- it was originally the "square shooter" company, terex bought them out, built them for a few years, and sold the line off to genie. In much the same way as in the cranes- they bought the old P&H/ lorain/ american crane lines- operated for a while, and then got out of it. Terex was kind of known for that in equipment lines- and I think its a crappy way to do business.

So you won't get any terex support for the machine, but its really not that complicated.
 

John C.

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 11, 2007
Messages
12,872
Location
Northwest
Occupation
Machinery & Equipment Appraiser
Genie is the parts supplier for the Terex units. They have changed some suppliers though. I worked on one in the last year or so and put a hydraulic pump in it. Pump was a different manufacturer and there was no information on how to set it up. I found a web site describing the pump for another machine and used that to calibrate the pump to the machine. That's the kid of stuff you can expect from Terex.
 

Quick_Mick

Member
Joined
Jan 27, 2022
Messages
16
Location
Michigan
We use the 10054 skytracks at work and they are handier than a shirt pocket. We have had a couple get buggered up when someone tries to extend out 40’ and pick something up ridiculously heavy. I’ve seen two guys bend the booms on them through brute strength and ignorance.
 

crane operator

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 27, 2009
Messages
8,382
Location
sw missouri
I'm going to put in a picture of a couple jibs and a work basket. I prefer the pin on jib, rather than the jib that slides on the forks, it really saves on weight.

When you get your work basket, make sure it has forklift pockets in the center and on the end, you will use both at different times. And always put the pin in that locks the basket to the forks, we lost a guy here in town 8-10 years ago when a green operator tilted down instead of booming down, and slid the basket right off the forks.



QuickAttachTrussJib.jpg
upload_2022-2-27_20-21-8.jpeg

formount-platform.png
 

skyking1

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 3, 2020
Messages
7,775
Location
washington
A 1056 or 1054 with outrigger and jib can get a lot done, safely. As mentioned above know your limitations, the ground you are on. They tear the heck out of soft sites.
 

skyking1

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 3, 2020
Messages
7,775
Location
washington
Thanks for linking this post @crane operator , this job is coming up this summer, and now the hunt can begin again. The logs for the first cabin are due in late April if the roads are good for it.
We can get creative with the backfill and grading and get pretty close with the telehandler, I think.
 
Top